About Jennifer Poleon

Jennifer Poleon is the Digital Communications Manager for Columbus Museum of Art, and the organizer for CMA’s 2015 #MobilePhotoNow mobile photography exhibition.

Celebrating Women’s History Month

Reception by Honore Sharrer

Celebrate Women’s History Month with us during March as we highlight the creative contributions of women artists.

Discover Great Works by Women Artists
Exhibition: A Dangerous Women: Surrealism and Subversion in the Art of Honoré Sharrer. Sharrer’s gender, commitment to leftist ideals, and use of figurative surrealism put her at odds with the dominant political and artistic climate of the 1950s. Read more about this original CMA exhibition in the recent Columbus Dispatch review.

In the Galleries
Look for special Collective Voices Guide by Cell in the galleries featuring women artists, and those inspired by them. Pick up a copy of the guide at the front desk and look for special labels in the galleries.


Women’s History Month Events

Women Artists at CMA Tours
Join one of the special Women Artists at CMA tours on March 10, 19, 23, 24, and 26, and special tours of the Sharrer exhibition on March 5 and 18.
Open Studio
Every Saturday in March make your own art inspired by 5 women artists from CMA’s collection. Saturdays from 1:00-3:00 PM, included free with admission.
Wednesdays@2: Curator View
March 15, 2017 at 2:00 PM

Explore the new original CMA exhibition A Dangerous Woman: Subversion and Surrealism in the Art of Honoré Sharrer with Executive Director Nannette V. Maciejunes. $20 for nonmembers (includes general admission), and $5 for members. Register here.
Dangerous Women Create
Celebrate Women’s History Month and the creativity of women. Be here for Dangerous Women Create, an inspired evening hosted by CMA and Creative Babes for a pop-up reception and your chance to create together. March 23 from 6:00-8:00 PM, cash bar.

#5WomenArtists

Participate in the #5WomenArtists Campaign
Join in the national #5WomenArtists campaign. Many people have a tough time listing five women artists off the top of their heads. Can you name 5 women artists? Share your photos and comments about great women artists: #5womenartists #mycma @columbusmuseum.

[Top Image: Honoré Sharrer, Reception (detail), 1958, oil on canvas, 22 1/2 x 30 inches, Collection of Adam Zagorin and the late Perez Zagorin.]

Valentine’s Day Week & #HeartsforArt

 

HeartsforArt

Celebrate Valentine’s Day week with #HeartsforArt. Once again CMA is joining museums across the country to celebrate Valentine’s Day with #HeartsforArt, a special way for art lovers to show off their love of art.

  • Pick up a paper heart at the CMA admission desk and place it in front of an artwork you love, from February 14-19, 2017.
  • Share your love of art by taking a picture and hashtag #heartsforart and tag @columbusmuseum across your favorite social media platforms. We’ll share some of our favorites.

Other museums participating include: Crystal Bridges, Dallas Museum of Art, Denver Art Museum, Oakland Museum of California, Parrish Art Museum, Philbook Museum of Art, The Walters Museum of Art.

Ohio Artist Maya Lin Among Medal of Freedom Recipients

Artist Maya Lin is awarded the Medal of Freedom

Ohio artist Maya Lin was one of 21 recipients of the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Ohio artist Maya Lin was one of 21 recipients yesterday to receive the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor. Lin joined other innovators, artists, and pioneers in a ceremony in the White House East Room.

“The Presidential Medal of Freedom is not just our nation’s highest civilian honor – it’s a tribute to the idea that all of us, no matter where we come from, have the opportunity to change this country for the better.  From scientists, philanthropists, and public servants to activists, athletes, and artists, these 21 individuals have helped push America forward, inspiring millions of people around the world along the way,” said President Barack Obama.

Other Medal of Freedom recipients included Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Elouise Cobell, Ellen DeGeneres, Robert De Niro, Richard Garwin, Bill and Melinda Gates, Frank Gehry, Margaret H. Hamilton, Tom Hanks, Grace Hopper, Michael Jordan, Lorne Michaels, Newt Minow, Eduardo Padrón, Robert Redford, Diana Ross, Vin Scully, Bruce Springsteen, and Cicely Tyson.

“Her sculptures, chapels, homes are physical acts of poetry each reminding us that the most important element in art or architecture is human emotion,” said President Obama as he awarded Lin the Medal of Freedom.

Lin designed the Vietnam Veterans Memorial as a school project when she was just 21.

Topographic Landscape by Maya Lin

Topographic Landscape by Maya Lin, Columbus Museum of Art permanent collection. Hundreds of MDF boards are stacked on the floor to create undulating curves that resemble the rolling hills of Southern Ohio where Lin grew up.

Topographic Landscape by Maya Lin is part of Columbus Museum of Art’s permanent collection. Hundreds of MDF boards are stacked on the floor to create undulating curves that resemble the rolling hills of Southern Ohio where Lin grew up. The sculpture is on view now in CMA’s Walter Wing.

Watch the full Medal of Freedom ceremony here.

Jennifer Poleon is Digital Communications Manager for Columbus Museum of Art, and the organizer for CMA’s 2015 #MobilePhotoNow mobile photography exhibition.

 

Into the Light Photo Hunt Challenge

jensen700

Noted British Landscape painter Joseph Turner was a devotee of sun-staring or sun-gazing, which involves staring with the naked eye directly at the sun. Scientists had previously used the camera obscura to protect against the blinding brightness of the sun. Turner directly confronted it.

Like Turner, many artists in The Sun Placed in the Abyss also look directly at the sun, substituting their eyes with a camera. The “Into the Light,” section showcases artists who have pointed their camera at the sun or used sunlight as a medium itself. For many of them, the sun has provided the perfect universal and fixed thing from which to explore subjectivity, vision, and representation.

For this next Photo Hunt challenge respond with your take on this challenge:

  • Capture something that reflects the theme “Into the Light”
  • Tag your work on Instagram with #CMAIntotheLightChallenge
  • For this assignment you have until Monday November 28, 2016.
  • Please note: images must be your own. Anyone in the world can participate.
  • Images can be taken with any kind of camera.

Drew Sawyer, our new William J. and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography will select his favorites (based on the most creative entries, and ones that best represent the assignment), and your creation could become part of an online digital gallery.

We’ll also be celebrating with a special MeetUp and behind the scenes tour of The Sun Placed in the Abyss on the evening of January 5, so save the date!

[Pictured : The 49 States by Matthew Jensen. Jensen chooses a Google Street View image in which the camera captured the sun in each of the forty-nine states that were covered by the online mapping tool when he was working on the project. These mostly rural landscapes, despite their separation from people and cities, are still touched by technology.]

CMA Photo Hunt Challenges are Back!

Our Photo Hunt Challenges are back! CMA Photo Hunts are a digital complement to CMA collections and exhibitions, give participants an opportunity to flex their creativity, be inspired by works or themes in Columbus Museum of Art exhibitions or collections, and respond to creative challenges leveraging the power of social media and the smart phone.

For this next Photo Hunt challenge series get inspired by the new The Sun Placed in the Abyss exhibition, then respond with your take on this challenge:

  • Capture something that reimagines the classic sunset or sunrise image
  • Tag your work on Instagram with #SunatCMAChallenge
  • For this assignment you have until Monday November 7, 2016.
  • Please note: images must be your own. Anyone in the world can participate.
  • Images can be taken with any kind of camera.

Drew Sawyer, our new William J. and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography will select his favorites (based on the most creative entries, and ones that best represent the assignment), and your creation could become part of an online digital gallery.

We’ll also be celebrating with a special MeetUp and behind the scenes tour of The Sun Placed in the Abyss on the evening of January 5, so save the date!

To give you some ideas to get you started, here are two artists from The Sun Placed in the Abyss who have reimagined the classic sun shot in different ways.

Lisa Oppenheim

As a subject the sunset not only contains the suggestion of mortality, but also implies some other, invisible place beyond the horizon. For Lisa Oppenheim’s “The Sun is Always Setting Somewhere Else,” (above) Oppenheim printed out images from Flickr of photos taken of sunsets by U.S. Soldiers stationed in Iraq, then held them up to the New York sunset, horizons aligned.

horvitz500

For “The Distance of a Day,” (above) by David Horvitz, the artist journeyed halfway around the world to the exact location, in the Maldives, where he could see the sunrise at the same moment that his mother was watching the sunset in California. Recorded and presented on two cellphones, Horvitz’s work is a poetic image of the measurement that separates two people in time.

Our ongoing Photo Hunt project is very much about connecting, building, and supporting the talented photography community around the world. So please help spread the word about this Photo Hunt challenge, and give a shout out to photographers whose work you admire.

Happy shooting!

 

 

 

The I-71 Project: Politics, Art, and the Election in Swing State Ohio

BlahBlahBlah by Mel Bochner, part of the I-71 Project, a collaboration between Columbus Museum of Art and Contemporary Arts Center Cincinnati

 

Columbus Museum of Art Curator of Contemporary Art Tyler Cann talks about Artist Mel Bochner’s BLAHBLAHBLAH sculpture, which forms part of the I-71 Project, a public art project in Ohio on the language of politics. Art by artists Mel Bochner, Ryan McGinness,  Lisa Anne Auerbach, Glenn Ligon and Kay Rosen is presented on billboards and other road signage that both mimics and critiques the theater of red-versus-blue politics during the U.S. presidential campaign. The I-71-Project is a collaboration between the Columbus Museum of Art in Columbus, Ohio and the Contemporary Arts Center Cincinnati (CAC), and artist and independent curator Anne Thompson.

Mel Bochner’s temporary sculpture, an LED road sign flashing BLAH BLAH BLAH in the heart of downtown Columbus at Third and State streets near the Ohio Statehouse, as well as, the entrance plaza of Columbus Museum of Art, is a wry commentary on the state of public discourse and our capacity to listen. We tend to use the phrase “blah, blah, blah” to dismiss the statements of people we disagree with. It signals exhaustion with the general noise of every day life, a condition familiar during a Presidential election campaign, and particularly to Ohioans living in a swing state. But who is saying “blah, blah, blah,” and who is dismissing it? We’ve all been in one position or the other. Whether this phrase points to politicians, the media, corporations, the public— or indeed, art itself — remains open to each viewer’s perspective.

Also look for Ryan McGinness’s Re-elect Skull & Bones, which appears on a dramatic panoramic billboard (21 x 60 feet) on I-71 North, halfway between Cincinnati and Columbus. You can find the sign about three miles south of exit 45 for Waynesville/Wilmington (GPS 39.4557, -83.9952). Styled as a political ad, the work displays a symbol associated with tombstones, poison, pirates, and a Yale secret society whose former members include U.S. politicians of both parties. Complex and compelling in its many possible meanings, Re-elect Skull & Bones urges rebellion and interrogates our democracy as a closed circle. Re-elect Skull & Bones campaign buttons and bumper stickers­ are available in both museums.

During the run-up to Election Day, a variety of billboard-based artworks will appear in stages in the downtown areas of Cincinnati and Columbus and along the I-71 Interstate corridor that connects the two cities. Additional work includes Glenn Ligon’s renditions of the word “America” into neon signs that wrestle with the political connotations of black and white; Lisa Anne Auerbach’s translation of political slogans from historical American elections into patterns emblazoning knit sweaters on billboards; and Kay Rosen’s BLURRED, an iconic image that embodies the project’s playful critique of partisanship and polarization.