About Jennifer Poleon

CMA's Digital Communications Manager

4th CMA Photo Hunt Instagram Exhibition

4th CMA Photo Hunt Exhibition

You still have time to check out the fourth CMA Photo Hunt exhibition, now on view in the Community Gallery.

Work from than three dozen photographers was chosen for our fourth CMA Photo Hunt installation of mobile photography. Assignments for this round of Columbus Museum of Art Photo Hunts were inspired by hot contemporary photographer Matthew Brandt and our recently on view Matthew Brandt  sticky/dusty/wet exhibition, the first museum show for the Los Angeles based photographer. Brandt processes his photos using nontraditional materials such as bubble gum, honey bees, Pop rocks, and more, was recently named by Forbes the “Top 30 under 30 in art and design.” Our William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography selected her favorites from more than 1,000 photos submitted via Instagram in the six assigned categories: Soaked, Distressed, Sweet, Elemental, Embed, and Neon.

PhotoHunt4Distressed

CMA Photo Hunts are a digital complement to CMA collections and exhibitions, give participants an opportunity to flex their creativity, be inspired by works or themes in Columbus Museum of Art exhibitions or collections, and respond to creative challenges with their own visual take. Since our Photo Hunts began we have received nearly 5,000 submissions from hundreds of photographers from Seattle to Ohio to Paris to Russia. With our first exhibition in 2012, we were first museum in the world to present a curated, crowdsourced installation based on the popular photo sharing app Instagram.

The 4th CMA Photo Hunt exhibition will remain on view through April 13, 2014.

Follow Columbus Museum of Art on Instagram.

Questions regarding CMA Photo Hunts? Contact the project head, CMA’s Digital Communications Manager, Jennifer Poleon.

Art Speaks. Join the Conversation.

Hearts for Art for Valentine’s Day

Hearts for Art

Get into the spirit of Valentine’s Day and help spread your love of art with our HeartsforArt project, February 11-15.

o   Pick up a free felt/paper heart at the Admissions Desk
o   Place the heart on the floor in front of a work of art you love.
o   Take a picture of your heart placed next to a work you love, and post on Instagram or Twitter tagged with #heartsforart for your chance to win a Matthew Brandt catalogue and passes.

We’ll announce the winner next week on Twitter and Instagram.

Fun Fact: Four other museum crushes are playing along with us in some way:  Oakland Museum of California, Minneapolis Institute of Art, Philbrook Museum of Art, Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History.

(Please note: Hearts and photography are permitted in all CMA galleries except Toulouse-Lautrec and La Vie Moderne, and works marked with a no photography sign).

6th Brandt Inspired Photo Hunt Challenge

The current round of CMA Photo Hunt assignments are inspired by our now on view Matthew Brandt: Sticky/Dusty/Wet, the first museum show for the hot Los Angeles based photographer. Brandt processes his photos using nontraditional materials such as bubble gum, honey bees, Pop rocks, and more, was recently named by Forbes the “Top 30 under 30 in art and design.”

BubblegumHere in an homage to a classic Ansel Adams shot, Brandt uses bubble gum in the processing. With that in mind, respond with your take on the sixth challenge:

  • Capture something that reflects  “Sticky” either in concept or process
  • Tag your work on Instagram with #CMAPhotoHunt and #Sticky
  • For this sixth assignment you have until Friday December 06, 2013.
  • Please note: images must be your own. Anyone in the world can participate.

Once again our William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography Catherine Evans will select her favorites (based on the most creative entries, and ones that best represent the assignment), and your creation could grace the walls at Columbus Museum of Art. The third CMA Photo Hunt exhibition was on display July-October in our Community Gallery, and featured work inspired by our COLOR exhibition in the Big Idea Gallery.

CMA Photo Hunts are a digital complement to CMA collections and exhibitions, give participants an opportunity to flex their creativity, be inspired by works or themes in Columbus Museum of Art exhibitions or collections, and respond to creative challenges with their own visual take. Since our Photo Hunts began we have received nearly 5,000 submissions from hundreds of photographers from Seattle to Ohio to Paris to Russia. With our first exhibition last fall, we were first museum in the world to present a curated, crowdsourced installation based on the popular photo sharing app Instagram.

Looking forward to seeing your visual response. Happy shooting!

5th Brandt Inspired Photo Hunt Challenge

Brandt Bees of Bees 2 2012 (detail 1)

The current round of CMA Photo Hunt assignments are inspired by our upcoming exhibition Matthew Brandt: Sticky/Dusty/Wet, which opens November 15, and is the first museum show for the hot Los Angeles based photographer. Brandt processes his photos using nontraditional materials such as bubble gum, honey bees, Pop rocks, and more, was recently named by Forbes the “Top 30 under 30 in art and design.”

Here Brandt embeds bees during the processing.With that in mind, respond with your take on the fifth challenge:

  • Capture something that reflects  “Embed” either in concept or process
  • Tag your work on Instagram with #CMAPhotoHunt and #Embed
  • For this fifth assignment you have until Friday November 22, 2013.
  • Please note: images must be your own. Anyone in the world can participate.

Once again our William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography Catherine Evans will select her favorites (based on the most creative entries, and ones that best represent the assignment), and your creation could grace the walls at Columbus Museum of Art. The third CMA Photo Hunt exhibition was on display July-October in our Community Gallery, and featured work inspired by our COLOR exhibition in the Big Idea Gallery.

CMA Photo Hunts are a digital complement to CMA collections and exhibitions, give participants an opportunity to flex their creativity, be inspired by works or themes in Columbus Museum of Art exhibitions or collections, and respond to creative challenges with their own visual take. Since our Photo Hunts began we have received more 4,000 submissions from hundreds of photographers from Seattle to Ohio to Paris to Russia. With our first exhibition last fall, we were first museum in the world to present a curated, crowdsourced installation based on the popular photo sharing app Instagram.

We’ll post the sixth and last in this series of Brandt-inspired Photo Hunt assignments here on our blog, and on Instagram on November 22.

Happy shooting!

(Bees of Bees 2, 2012 by Matthew Brandt, private collection).

4th Brandt Inspired Photo Hunt Challenge

Brandt, Lake Luis, WA 5

The current round of CMA Photo Hunt assignments are inspired by our upcoming exhibition Matthew Brandt: Sticky/Dusty/Wet, the first museum show for the hot Los Angeles based photographer. Brandt processes his photos using nontraditional materials such as bubble gum, honey bees, Pop rocks, and more.

Here Brandt in another one of Brandt’s Lakes and Reservoirs series, he uses lake water from Lake Luis is Washington in his large scale processing. So with that in mind, respond with your take on the fourth challenge:

  • Capture something that reflects  “Elemental” either in concept or process
  • Tag your work on Instagram with #CMAPhotoHunt and #Elemental
  • For this fourth assignment you have until Friday November 8, 2013.
  • Please note: images must be your own. Anyone in the world can participate.

Once again our William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography Catherine Evans will select her favorites (based on the most creative entries, and ones that best represent the assignment), and your creation could grace the walls at Columbus Museum of Art. The third CMA Photo Hunt exhibition is on display now through October in our Community Gallery, and features work selected by Evans.

CMA Photo Hunts give participants an opportunity to flex their creativity, be inspired by works or themes in Columbus Museum of Art exhibitions or collections, and respond to creative challenges with their own photographic take. Since our Photo Hunts began we have received more 4,000 submissions from hundreds of photographers from Seattle to Ohio to Paris to Russia. With our first exhibition last fall, we were first museum in the world to present a curated, crowdsourced installation based on the popular photo sharing app Instagram.

Watch for additional biweekly Photo Hunt assignments here on our blog, and on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

(Lake Luis, WA 5, 2012 by Matthew Brandt. From the series Lakes and Reservoirs, Chromogenic print soaked in Horse Thief Lake water. Private Collection)

3rd Brandt Inspired Crowdsourced CMA Photo Hunt

Third Matthew Brandt inspired crowdsourced CMA Photo Hunt assignment. Hills Creek Lake by Brandy

The current round of CMA Photo Hunt assignments are inspired by our upcoming exhibition Matthew Brandt: Sticky/Dusty/Wet, the first museum show for the hot Los Angeles based photographer. Brandt processes his photos using nontraditional materials such as bubble gum, honey bees, Pop rocks, and more.

Here Brandt uses lake water in his large scale processing. So with that in mind, respond with your take on the third challenge:

  • Capture something that reflects  “Distressed” either in concept or process
  • Tag your work on Instagram with #CMAPhotoHunt and #Distressed
  • For this third assignment you have until Friday October 25, 2013.
  • Please note: images must be your own. Anyone in the world can participate.

Once again our William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography Catherine Evans will select her favorites (based on the most creative entries, and ones that best represent the assignment), and your creation could grace the walls at Columbus Museum of Art. The third CMA Photo Hunt exhibition is on display now through November in our Community Gallery, and features work selected by Evans.

Since our Photo Hunts began we have received nearly 4,000 submissions from hundreds of photographers from Seattle to Ohio to Paris to Russia. With our first exhibition last fall, we were first museum in the world to present a curated, crowdsourced installation based on the popular photo sharing app Instagram.

Watch for additional biweekly Photo Hunt assignments here on our blog, and on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

(Hills Creek Lake, OR 3, 2009 by Matthew Brandt)

Art and Ice Cream: Q&A with Jeni of Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams

Jeni Britton Bauer

Recently we caught up with Jeni Britton Bauer, James Beard award-winning cookbook author and founder of Columbus-based Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams to get her take on art, thinking like an artist, and her inspiration for creating an ice cream tribute to George Bellows.

Why does art matter to you?
Art answers the emotional Why? When I dig deep to find out, I gain new perspective. It’s time travel.  Why this? Why that? Why now? Why him?

What role does art play in your life?
It expands into the cracks and fills the gaps. Art helps me draw conclusions and make connections. When I think, I use all parts of my brain. It’s like when you work out, if you worked only one arm, you would have one big arm and one small one. Artistic thinking, which is not necessarily creative thinking, is a vital part of my thought process.

In ice cream I use art thinking when I decide what I’ll do with, say, a raspberry. Raspberries are a beautiful and perfect fruit in color, texture and flavor. There is nothing better than a raspberry and nothing you can add to a raspberry to make it more perfect. I can honor a raspberry by making a sorbet with as little else as possible. Just a bit of sugar. Pulverized. This is art because I have chosen to leave it almost in it’s original form. If I added tarragon to it, or mint, or even honey, which seem like fine things to do, I would have distracted the flavor. Because you can’t make a raspberry better or even more interesting. However, in a sorbet form, rather than a whole raspberry, the flavor is pink-red, and surprisingly grassy, a little tart and a bit sweet, a tiny bit biting and bitter. Things you may not even notice when chomping on a fresh berry.

Anything that a raspberry touches is given a kick in the pants. Think of a simple cake with raspberry sorbet melting into the crumb, or a rich chocolate cake. A scoop of dense raspberry sorbet plopped into a cup of Watershed gin with a sprig of lavender hanging off the rim (you smell it as you bring it to your nose), is the ice and the mixer in a fresh cocktail I call Rouge Your Knees. I can make fresh raspberries into a sauce and swirl it through a soft farmstead cheese ice cream. Raspberries become a tool in my ice cream arsenal to make softer flavors sing. I may use the sorbet to pop other flavors, but I’ll never add something other than a touch of sugar to the raspberries. They are perfect already.

Art answers why. Just because you put something together, should you? If you ask yourself this question about everything you do, art will play a big part of your life, too.

How are food and art alike?
They are both essential for survival.

What about George Bellows inspires you?
I am lucky to have seen the Bellows show at the National Gallery in Washington D.C and again at the Met in NYC. To see so many of his pieces here in his hometown is really wonderful. To see the paintings all together was life changing to me. I truly fell for George Bellows. I spent hours visiting the paintings. I jumped into them, especially the New York scenes. I love to compare his work to Winslow Homer, another of my favorite painters. I think that George Bellows’ work is edgier, it’s tougher, it’s bolder, and harder to take in, and that’s what makes it so strong for me. You can read his faces in his portraits. You can smell the air in his landscapes. You can feel the salt on your cheeks when you see the spray of the wave in his seascapes. And you begin to feel what his subjects felt. Some were suffering or struggling and the way he paints them you feel their struggles. Often the faces are smudges of many colors of paint, but they come through vividly, as if I know them personally. I also love the colors that are in each painting. If you look closely you will find may colors.

Bellows.ChurnAndBreak

Tell us about how you created the George Bellows flavor
My great grandparents had a big old house in Maine that I visited when I was 9 years old. It had secret passages behind walls, the kind where you pull the candlestick and the wall opens up. Those passages were hiding spots and escape routes on one of the last stops on the Underground Railroad. You could get all the way out to the back of the property through the wall of the living room. When you emerged, you would be in the middle of an old graveyard. Spooky. That summer I spent time frolicking in the cold New England waters. I ate salt water taffy, iced coffee and lobster for the first time. There is something about Maine that I got a glimpse of that summer that has stayed with me all these years, and that I revisit in Bellows’ paintings of the sea, especially the painting Churn and Break, which also has a name that sounds like an ice cream flavor. The sea churns, the ice cream churns.

It’s not just the sea that is salty, it’s the air. I wanted the ice cream to taste like salt water taffy. And we use salt from the sea, so the ice cream has that flavor. The cookies are colored to match specific parts of the waves. Inside you will find a fresh plum sauce. They are in season in Ohio, so it’s good timing, but it also adds the deep purple color of the rocks in the painting. I also think that plums have a salty scent to them. That’s hard to imagine, but it’s true. Even plum blossoms smell salty to me. So Sea Salt and Plum Jam was my tribute to George Bellows’ painting Churn and Break.

BellowsIceCream700

How does the Columbus community incubate creativity?
I make a distinction between art and creativity. Creativity has very little to do with art. You can be an artist and not be an especially creative thinker (as my raspberry example above). But, I’m not convinced that you can be a scientist without being a creative thinker. So let’s all agree that creativity is very important. It’s important for artists, scientists, mathletes, farmers, chefs, and moms and dads. If you can’t think creatively then you rob yourself and your community of the ability to change the world.

When you encounter a brick wall, you may turn around. I see potential in a brick wall, I see opportunity. Sometimes I can get over it, sometimes I can knock it down. And I get to reap the benefits of what’s on the other side. Creativity is seeing potential and opportunity where others don’t.

So how do we nurture this in Columbus? We are lucky to have such incredible art museums, fountains, parks, devoted musicians, and playthings. We are lucky to have artists living here and to have entire districts devoted to art. But let’s do better because it’s important. Kids used to learn to draw in school. Really draw. Now we don’t. Drawing is important because it can help you explain things to people. It can help you work through a problem. I think everyone should learn to draw. It’s like I said above, if you only learned math and science then it’s like a body builder who only works out one arm and one leg. We have to do a better job nurturing whole brain thinkers. That has to start in kindergarten and before. Art incubates creative thinking because it forces you to move emotions and thoughts through your body and finger tips and transpose them onto paper, canvas, or other mediums.

Who are some of your favorite artists?
Frank Stella, George Bellows, Matisse, Picasso, Gauguin, Wayne Thiebaud, Richard Diebenkorn, and my daughter Greta.

George Bellows and the American Experience will remain on view at CMA through January 4, 2014. Jeni’s Sea Salt and Plum Jam Bellows-inspired ice cream will be served exclusively at our annual Art Celebration and ArtFUSION on October 19, 2013.

Free Admission for Smithsonian’s 9th Annual Museum Day Live

MuseumEntrance

The Columbus Museum of Art will offer free admission on Saturday September 28, 2013, as part of Smithsonian magazine’s ninth annual Museum Day Live! A nationwide event, Museum Day Live! offers free admission to visitors presenting a Museum Day Live! ticket at a participating museum or cultural institution.

Inclusive by design, the event represents Smithsonian’s commitment to make learning and the spread of knowledge accessible to everyone, giving museums across all 50 states the opportunity to emulate the admission policy of the Smithsonian museums in Washington, D.C. Last year’s event drew over 400,000 participants, and this year’s event expects record-high participation.

Admission includes CMA’s George Bellows and the American Experience exhibition. George Bellows is widely considered to be one of the finest artists America has ever produced. Bellows left Columbus, Ohio in 1904 to study art in New York City, and within five years the young artist had taken the American art world by storm, winning every major award all the while insisting upon a new, and often unsettling, standard for the subject matter deemed acceptable as fine art. This exhibition, which includes more than 35 paintings as well as major drawings and prints, reveals the virtuosic ability and amazing breath of this master painter. And don’t forget to see COLOR, a lively, hands-on exhibition in CMA’s Big Idea Gallery.

The Museum Day Live! ticket is available to download at Smithsonian.com/museumday. Visitors who present the Museum Day Live! ticket will gain free entrance for two at participating venues for one day only. One ticket is permitted per household, per email address. For more information about Museum Day Live! 2013 and a list of participating museums and cultural institutions, please visit Smithsonian.com/museumday.

Please note: you can also present your Museum Day Live! ticket on the screen of your smartphone.

Parking is available for free in our lot off Gay Street. Please use the new entrance off the West Garden on 9th Street.

Be sure to tag your visit with @columbusmuseum and #museumdaylive on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.

Oh So Sweet CMA Photo Hunt Challenge 2

Gummy Bears 5, 2012 (Low-res)Brandt

We’re super impressed with your response to the first Matthew Brandt inspired challenge. These CMA Photo Hunt assignments are inspired by our upcoming exhibition Matthew Brandt: Sticky/Dusty/Wet, the first museum show for the hot Los Angeles based photographer. Brandt processes his photos using nontraditional materials such as bubble gum, honey bees, Pop rocks, and more.

Here Brandt uses gummy bears in his large scale processing. So with that in mind, respond with your take on the second challenge:

  • Capture something that reflects  “Sweet” either in concept or process
  • Tag your work on Instagram with #CMAPhotoHunt and #Sweet
  • For this second assignment you have until Friday October 11, 2013.
  • Please note: images must be your own. Anyone in the world can participate.

Once again our William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography Catherine Evans will select her favorites (based on the most creative entries, and ones that best represent the assignment), and your creation could grace the walls at Columbus Museum of Art. The third CMA Photo Hunt exhibition is on display now through November in our Community Gallery, and features work selected by Evans.

Since our Photo Hunts began we have received nearly 4,000 submissions from hundreds of photographers from Seattle to Ohio to Paris to Russia. With our first exhibition last fall, we were first museum in the world to present a curated, crowdsourced installation based on the popular photo sharing app Instagram.

Watch for additional biweekly Photo Hunt assignments here on our blog, and on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

(Gummy Bears 5, 2012 by Matthew Brandt)

4th CMA Photo Hunt Series

Sylvan Lake, CA 3_580

We’re pleased to announce our fourth CMA Photo Hunt Challenge. This next series of assignments are inspired by our upcoming exhibition Matthew Brandt: Sticky/Dusty/Wet, the first museum show for the hot Los Angeles based photographer. Brandt processes his photos using nontraditional materials such as bubble gum, honey bees, Pop rocks, and more.

Get inspired by Brandt’s work and respond with your take on the first challenge:

  • Capture something that reflects “soaked” either in concept or process
  • Tag your work on Instagram with #CMAPhotoHunt and #Soaked
  • For this first assignment you have until Friday September 27, 2013.
  • Please note: images must be your own. Anyone in the world can participate.

Once again our William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography Catherine Evans will select her favorites (based on the most creative entries, and ones that best represent the assignment), and your creation could grace the walls at Columbus Museum of Art. The third CMA Photo Hunt exhibition is on display now through November in our Community Gallery, and features work selected by Evans.

Since our Photo Hunts began we have received nearly 5,000 submissions from hundreds of photographers from Seattle to Ohio to Paris to Russia. With our first exhibition last fall, we were first museum in the world to present a curated, crowdsourced installation based on the popular photo sharing app Instagram. Read more about the inception of the Photo Hunt project in stories in The Columbus Dispatch, Art Daily, and Clic France, and Columbus Alive.

Watch for additional biweekly Photo Hunt assignments here on our blog, and on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Here’s a peek inside Brandt’s studio to give you ideas to get you started.

We can’t wait to see what you come up with for this next Photo Hunt series. Happy shooting!

(IMAGE: by Matthew Brandt from the series Lakes and Reservoirs Sylvan Lake, SD 3, 2012, Chromogenic print soaked in Sylvan Lake water, Unique. © Matthew Brandt, Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York)