About Jennifer Poleon

CMA's Digital Communications Manager

12 for 12: Kojo Kamau Chronicles Columbus

In the next in our 12 for 12 Columbus Bicentennial series honoring Columbus artists from our permanent collection, we highlight photographer Kojo Kamau.

Throughout his life, Kojo Kamau has made major contributions to the vitality of the arts in Columbus. His photographs chronicle Columbus not only as his home, but also as a cultural, artistic, and political crossroads. For five decades, his work has detailed a changing landscape, acknowledging the troubled political and social history of African Americans, but always through a positive lens. Community, travels, portraits of artists and musicians, both local and international, and social issues are constant themes. Kojo was greatly inspired by Elijah Pierce, whom he photographed numerous times (as you can see in the above picture). In addition to his photographic work, Kojo has been an essential, avid activist and supporter of the arts. In 1979 he and his late wife, Mary Ann Williams, founded Art for Community Expression (ACE), a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting the work of African-American artists.

Born Robert Jones in 1939, in 1970 he changed his name to Kojo Kamau, which means “unconquerable quiet one” in Yoruba, one of the many languages spoken in West Africa. He attended the Rochester Institute of Technology, The Ohio State University, and the Columbus College of Art and Design to study photography. From 1964 until 1994 Kojo was the chief photographer for The Ohio State University College of Medicine. Currently he teaches photography at Columbus State Community College.

(Above: Pierce Painting a Carving in His Shop by Kojo Kamau from the Columbus Museum of Art permanent collection).

Art Speaks. Join the Conversation.

 

CMA Photo Hunt Assignment 8: Summer

For the eighth CMA Photo Hunt assignment (and the second to last challenge) here is your assignment:

  • Capture something that reflects the word “Summer”
  • Tag your work on Instagram, Twitter, or Flickr with #CMAPhotoHunt and #Summer plus your #city.
  • For this next assignment you have until Friday August 24, 2012.

Catherine Evans, our William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography, will select a few of her favorites, and your creation could grace the walls at Columbus Museum of Art come this fall. Catherine recently chose another round of her favorites. See what she picked in this Curator’s Choice post. Her choices ranged from an ethereal shot of Scioto Mile to a moving portrait of a veteran.

See how people captured and interpreted all the assignments so far in the CMA Photo Hunt Gallery.

CMA Photo Hunts are inspired by our The Radical Camera show and the Photo Leaguers, who challenged themselves with assignments that captured a word or phrase. Through the run of The Radical Camera we’ve been posting new photo assignment challenges. Anyone around the world can participate. Photos you have already taken that fit each assignment, are also encouraged.

(Photo: Muscle Beach, Santa Monica California,  by Max Yavno, 1949, Columbus Museum of Art, Ohio, Photo League Collection, Museum Purchase with funds provided by Elizabeth M. Ross, the Derby Fund, John S. and Catherine Chapin Kobacker, and the Friends of the Photo League)

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Curator’s Choice: CMA Photo Hunts Round 2

Catherine Evans, our William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography, has selected some of her favorite CMA Photo Hunt submissions out of the hundreds of great entries tagged so far from Round 2. See what she chose from the Community, Pride and Contrast assignments, and why they work so well.

Our CMA Photo Hunt assignments are inspired by our The Radical Camera exhibition and the Photo League, a group of young photographers from the 1930s-1950s who took to the streets with their cameras just as photography was becoming recognized as an art. Their ranks including some of the most well-known photographers of the early to mid-20th century including W. Eugene Smith, Weegee, Lisette Model, Berenice Abbott, Aaron Siskind, Arthur Leipzig, and more.

Catherine’s ultimate favorites from the CMA Photo Hunts will be on display in our Community Gallery this fall.

Community

The little girl appears to have emerged out of a misty alien landscape in this surreal expression of community. The filter only enhances the atmosphere of this scene in this photograph by Rebecca (@reblyen).

 

In this shot by Taker of Photos people are scattered throughout the frame of the photograph with a slight aerial perspective. You can still read the individuals within the group, and the heart in the center is a subtle punctuation mark.

 

A charming and energetic view of a small community on parade from Nick Carron (@urbancurse). The leader in red animates the procession in full stride, while the van remains static in the background.

 

Pride

In this photograph by Liz Celeste (@mamawooste), pride is interpreted in a jar of pickles. A subject not often photographed is elevated to the status of an Old Master still life.

 

In this moving portrait of a veteran by @faytlefoto, black and white gives the subject a kind of gravitas. The creases of his face are elegantly reiterated in the folds of his shirt.

 

This view from the back makes the viewer a participant. The flag askew in the subject’s hair is a poignant detail in this photograph from Taker of Photos.

Contrast

Black and white. Male and female. Priest and nun. Contrast abounds in in this shot from Mitchell (@cbusgodfather).

 

This study in garish color by Tim Courlas (@durtball) demonstrates contrast in an unexpected, stylized way.

 

This photograph by Rebecca (@reblyen) offers an emphatic example of contrast from a worm’s eye view. The light and sliver of space between the buildings give dimension to this Columbus architectural gem.

Can’t wait to see what everyone submits for the last three assignments.

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Catherine Evans, CMA’s William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography

 

12 for 12: Roy Lichtenstein

For the next in our 12 for 12 Columbus Bicentennial series honoring Columbus artists from our permanent collection, we highlight OSU graduate, teacher and Pop Art sensation Roy Lichtenstein.

Roy Lichtenstein was a well-renowned American painter, sculptor and printmaker whose work was heavily influenced by advertising and comics. Lichtenstein attended the Ohio State University earning his BFA in 1951, then set off for Cleveland to work as an art teacher. By the early 1960s Lichtenstein gave up teaching to paint full-time and, WHAM!, become a defining member of the Pop Art Movement.

Lichtenstein drew from comic book themes such as passion, romance, science-fiction, violence and war, and used commercial art methods to create his signature Ben-day dot paintings. Lichtenstein also explored a a variety of historical art periods and transformed other artist’s works such as Pablo Picasso, Gilbert Stuart and Claude Monet. “These rank among the best experiments by any artist in blurring the distinction between high and low art. Lichtenstein is one of the few artists able to be ironic and exuberant at the same time, and nowhere do you feel this more than in his paintings that tweak the history of art,” said Paul Goldberger in Vanity Fair.  Currently The Art Institute of Chicago has a large Lichtenstein retrospective consisting of about 160 of Lichtenstein’s work on display. 

Lichtenstein’s sculpture Brushstrokes in Flight welcomes visitors to Columbus at Port Columbus International Airport.

Interesting Lichtenstein Facts:
•    Lichtenstein used to hide cartoon characters such as Mickey Mouse, Donald Duck and Bugs Bunny, in some of his early paintings.
•    In 1944, Lichtenstein designed a painting for the hull of the United States entry in the America’s Cup yacht race

(Above: Roy Lichtenstein, Modern Head #2 from the CMA permanent collection.)

CMA Photo Hunts Assignment 7: Curiosity

For the seventh CMA Photo Hunt assignment here is your challenge:

  • Capture something that reflects the word “Curiosity.”
  • Tag your work on Instagram, Twitter, or Flickr with #CMAPhotoHunt and #Curiosity plus your #city.
  • For this next assignment you have until Friday August 10, 2012.

Catherine Evans, our William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography, will select a few of her favorites, and your creation could grace the walls at Columbus Museum of Art come this fall.

In the sixth Columbus Museum of Art Photo Hunt assignment we challenged you to capture something that reflects the word “Contrast.” See how people captured and interpreted the first several assignments in the CMA Photo Hunt Gallery.

CMA Photo Hunts are inspired by our The Radical Camera show and the Photo Leaguers, who challenged themselves with assignments that captured a word or phrase. Through the run of The Radical Camera we’ll be posting new photo assignment challenges. Anyone around the world can participate. Photos you have already taken that fit each assignment, are also encouraged.

See the Curator’s Choice post for Catherine’s favorite photos from the first few assignments. Keep an eye out. We’ll be posting the next round of Catherine’s favorites next week.

(Photo: Louis Stettner Men Looking at Concentric Circles, New York, 1951 Gelatin silver print, 16 x 20 in. (40.6 x 50.8 cm) Columbus Museum of Art, Ohio, Photo League Collection, Museum Purchase with funds provided by Elizabeth M. Ross, the Derby Fund, John S. and Catherine Chapin Kobacker, and the Friends of the Photo League)

Art Speaks. Join the Conversation.

CMA Photo Hunt Assignment 6: Contrast

Henri Cartier Bresson

For the sixth CMA Photo Hunt assignment here is your challenge:

  • Capture something that reflects the word “Contrast.”
  • Tag your work on Twitter, Flickr or Instagram with #CMAPhotoHunt and #Contrast plus your #city.
  • For this next assignment you have until Tuesday July 24, 2012.

The Andalusia image above is from our collection and is by great French photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson. Bresson perfected his idea of the “decisive moment,” his characterization of the style that became his trademark. “Above all,” he once said, “I craved to seize the whole essence, in the confines of a single photograph, of some situation that was in the process of unfolding itself before my eyes.” So for this Contrast assignment, we also challenge you to use Bresson as your guide.

Catherine Evans, our William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography, will select a few of her favorites, and your creation could grace the walls at Columbus Museum of Art come this fall.

In the fifth Columbus Museum of Art Photo Hunt assignment we challenged you to capture something that reflects the word “Pride.” (You have until midnight tonight to submit Pride photos). See how people captured and interpreted the first several assignments in the CMA Photo Hunt Gallery.

CMA Photo Hunts are inspired by our The Radical Camera show and the Photo Leaguers, who challenged themselves with assignments that captured a word or phrase. Through the run of The Radical Camera we’ll be posting new photo assignment challenges. Anyone around the world can participate. Photos you have already taken that fit each assignment, are also encouraged.

See the Curator’s Choice post for Catherine’s favorite photos from the first few assignments. And happy shooting!

Art Speaks. Join the Conversation.

CMA Photo Hunt Assignment 5: Pride

For the fifth CMA Photo Hunt assignment here is your challenge:

  • Capture something that reflects the word “Pride.”
  • Tag your work on Twitter, Flickr or Instagram with #CMAPhotoHunt and #Pride plus your #city.
  • For this next assignment you have until Friday July 13, 2012.

We expect there will be a lot of fireworks submissions, but we challenge you to capture those small moments of pride, as well.

Catherine Evans, our William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography, will select a few of her favorites, and your creation could grace the walls at Columbus Museum of Art come this fall.

In the fourth Columbus Museum of Art Photo Hunt assignment we challenged you to capture something that reflects the word “Community.” (You have until midnight tonight to submit Community photos). See how people captured and interpreted the first several assignments in the CMA Photo Hunt Gallery.

CMA Photo Hunts are inspired by our The Radical Camera show and the Photo Leaguers, who challenged themselves with assignments that captured a word or phrase. Through the run of The Radical Camera we’ll be posting new photo assignment challenges. Anyone around the world can participate. Photos you have already taken that fit each assignment, are also encouraged.

Catherine has selected some of her favorite photos from the first few assignments. Look for a blog post soon with her choices, and and why they work so well.

Have a great Fourth of July, Doo Dah, Canada Day etc. Happy shooting!

Art Speaks. Join the Conversation.

CMA Acquires Lino Tagliapietra Glass Installation

We’re thrilled to announce that the Columbus Museum of Art has acquired Lino Tagliapietra’s glass installation Endeavor, an astounding and luminous work that magically captures Lino’s love of glass.  This armada of thirty-five boats suspended from the ceiling has become an iconic part of the Museum’s collection.

The purchase was made possible through the generosity of Museum donors, with a lead gift from Geraldine Schottenstein Hoffman. Additional support provided by Tom Davis and Anonymous, Pamela and Jack Beeler Family, Loann W. Crane, Howard Fradkin and Peter Kengeter, Barry Friedman and and Susanne Cobey Friedman, Fishel Foundation, Beth Loew, D. Scott Owens and Kevin J. Kowalski, Louise and Lake Polan, Stephen and Orlene Shimberg, Nannette and Sandy Solomon, and Jane H. Zimmerman.

Endeavor, on loan from the artist, featured prominently in CMA’s newly installed galleries when CMA unveiled its renovated building to the public on January 1, 2011. Endeavor was first displayed at CMA in 2003 as part of the traveling retrospective exhibition Concerto in Glass: The Art of Lino Tagliapietra organized by the Museum.  Inspired by the annual Festival of Saints, a city-wide ceremony that symbolizes Venice’s connection to the sea, Endeavor was an instant hit with CMA visitors and has become a beloved part of the Museum’s “great experiences.”

Lino was born in 1934 on the island of Murano, a locus of glassblowing whose history dates back to 1291.  At the age of twelve, Lino apprenticed with the glass master Archimede Seguso.  Nine years later, at the age of twenty-one, he earned the rank of maestro (master).

For the next twenty-five years, Lino worked in association with a number of Murano’s top glass factories, including Vetreria Galliano Ferro, Venini & Cie, La Murrina, Effretre Int’l., and EOS Design nel Vetro.  His influence on the American art glass studio movement is primarily attributed to his collaborations with Dale Chihuly.  In 1968, Chihuly visited Murano and studied with Lino as well as other glass masters.  In 1979, Lino traveled to America to teach at the Pilchuck Glass School in Washington State where he shared invaluable knowledge about glassblowing techniques that previously had been guarded trade secrets.  In the 1980s, Lino entered into the studio artist world after over a decade of traveling, teaching, and working with studio artists worldwide.  Today Tagliapietra is acknowledged as one of the leading masters of the contemporary art glass movement.

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12 for 12: Emerson Burkhart

Columbus native Emerson Burkhart believed all the world could be painted in Columbus and once declared, “I don’t need to go anywhere, it’s all here.” Burkhart is the next in our 12 for 12 series, our Columbus Bicentennial series highlighting Columbus artists from the Columbus Museum of Art permanent collection.

Burkhart was a dedicated painter of the American Scene, a school of artists from the Midwest in 1930s and 1940s whose league also included Thomas Hart Benton, Grant Wood and John Steuart Curry. Burkhart worked on murals for the Works Progress Administration including murals on display at the Greater Columbus Convention Center and OSU’s Stillman Hall.

“To come upon a painting by Burkhart, even in so fine a collection as that of the Columbus Museum of Art, is to feel that one has stumbled on something very special that others have missed,” CMA Folk Art Curator Michael Hall says in his book Emerson Burkhart: An Ohio Painter’s Song of Himself.

In this piece by Emerson Burkhart, The Confused Process of Becoming (Portrait of Roman Johnson), Burkhart painted fifty-four slashes on the back of the canvas to denote each session he worked on the painting.

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CMA Photo Hunt Assignment 4: Community

In the third Columbus Museum of Art Photo Hunt assignment we challenged you to capture something that reflects the word “Joy.” (You have until midnight tonight to submit Joy photos). See how people captured and interpreted the first few assignments in the CMA Photo Hunt Gallery.

CMA Photo Hunts are inspired by our The Radical Camera show and the Photo Leaguers, who challenged themselves to capture a word or phrase, and then they’d have a big party to critique and celebrate. Through the run of The Radical Camera we’ll be posting new photo assignment challenges. Anyone around the world can participate.

For the fourth CMA Photo Hunt assignment here is your challenge:

  • Capture something that reflects the word “Community.” How you capture it is up to you.
  • Tag your work on Twitter, Flickr or Instagram with #CMAPhotoHunt and #Community plus your #city.
  • For this next assignment you have until Friday June 29, 2012.

Catherine Evans, our William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography, will select a few of her favorites, and your creation could grace the walls at Columbus Museum of Art come this fall.

Most of you are submitting through Instagram. We encourage you to follow your fellow modern day Photo Leaguers, and comment on work that impresses you or moves you.

Look for a blog post in the next week or so from Catherine, who will be blogging about some of her favorite photos from the first three assignments, and why they work so well.

Keep up the good work!

Art Speaks. Join the Conversation.