About Jennifer Poleon

CMA's Digital Communications Manager

Making Faces Photo Assignment 4

This next round of Photo Hunt assignments are based on Making Faces, our exhibition currently on view in the Family Gallery that explores portraits from CMA’s collection, and includes work by Diane Arbus, Roy Lichtenstein, Miro, and other noted artists. Watch for biweekly assignments here on our blog, and on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. (Look for more assignments December 14, 2012, and December 28, 2012).

Here is your fourth Making Faces CMA Photo Hunt assignment:

  • Capture something that reflects the word double.
  • Tag your work on Instagram with #CMAPhotoHunt and #Double
  • Tag by midnight Friday December 14, 2012.
  • Please note: images must be your own; while preference may be given to Ohio-based photographers, anyone in the world can participate.

Once again our Photography Curator Catherine Evans will select her favorites (based on the most creative entries, and ones that best represent the theme), and your creation could be part of the next CMA Photo Hunt installation this January 2013. (We’ll be selecting from the first few assignments in mid-December.)

Altogether we received nearly 900 submissions from more than 100 photographers from the first round of CMA Photo Hunts. The resulting exhibition now on view through December 31, 2012 includes more three dozen photos from nearly two dozen Columbus area photographers. The installation is the first museum show in the U.S. based on the popular photo sharing app Instagram. Read more about the inception of the Photo Hunt project in stories in The Columbus Dispatch, Art Daily, and Clic France, and Columbus Alive, and view the NBC4 story.

To see a collection of all the images that have been submitted since the inception of our Photo Hunts, view the CMA Photo Hunt Online Gallery.

Be sure to follow us on Instagram at columbusmuseum where we’ll also be highlighting some of our favorites. We can’t wait to see what you come up with!

(Photo: Identical Twins, Roselle, NJ, 1967, by Diane Arbus. On loan from the private collection of Tim and Libby Tarrier for our Making Faces exhibition).

Making Faces Photo Hunt Assignment 3

This next round of Photo Hunt assignments are based on Making Faces, our exhibition currently on view in the Family Gallery that explores portraits from CMA’s collection, and includes work by Diane Arbus, Roy Lichtenstein, Miro, and other noted artists. Watch for biweekly assignments here on our blog, and on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. (Look for additional assignments November 30, 2012, December 14, 2012, and December 28, 2012).

Here is your third Making Faces CMA Photo Hunt assignment:

  • Capture something that reflects what family means to you.
  • Tag your work on Instagram with #CMAPhotoHunt and #Family
  • Tag by midnight Friday November 30, 2012.
  • Please note: images must be your own; while preference may be given to Ohio-based photographers, anyone in the world can participate.

Once again our Photography Curator Catherine Evans will select her favorites (based on the most creative entries, and ones that best represent the theme), and your creation could be part of the next CMA Photo Hunt installation this January 2013. (We’ll be selecting from the first few assignments in mid-December.)

Altogether we received nearly 900 submissions from more than 100 photographers from the first round of CMA Photo Hunts. The resulting exhibition now on view through December 31, 2012 includes more three dozen photos from nearly two dozen Columbus area photographers. The installation is the first museum show in the U.S. based on the popular photo sharing app Instagram. Read more about the inception of the Photo Hunt project in stories in The Columbus Dispatch, Art Daily, and Clic France, as well as view the NBC4 story.

To see a collection of all the images that have been submitted since the inception of our Photo Hunts, view the CMA Photo Hunt Online Gallery.

Be sure to follow us on Instagram at columbusmuseum where we’ll also be highlighting some of our favorites. We can’t wait to see how you express yourself with this next assignment!

(Photo: Flower Girl with her Mother and Grandmother, Mundelien, Illinois, 1996, by Melissa Ann Pinney. Gift of Joanne and Richard Press, Boston).

Making Faces Photo Hunt Assignment 2

This next round of Photo Hunt assignments are based on Making Faces, our exhibition currently on view in the Family Gallery that explores portraits from CMA’s collection, and includes work by Diane Arbus, Roy Lichtenstein, Miro, and other noted artists. Watch for biweekly assignments here on our blog, and on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. (Look for additional assignments November 16, 2012, November 30, 2012, December 14, 2012, and December 28, 2012).

Here is your second Making Faces Photo Hunt assignment:

  • Capture something that reflects the phrase “Funny Face”
  • Tag your work on Instagram with #CMAPhotoHunt and #FunnyFace
  • Tag by midnight Friday November 16, 2012.
  • Please note: images must be your own; while preference may be given to Ohio-based photographers, anyone in the world can participate.

Once again our Photography Curator Catherine Evans will select her favorites (based on the most creative entries, and ones that best represent the theme), and your creation could be part of the next CMA Photo Hunt installation this January 2013.

Altogether we received nearly 900 submissions from more than 100 photographers from the first round of CMA Photo Hunts. The resulting exhibition now on view through December 31, 2012 includes more three dozen photos from nearly two dozen Columbus area photographers. The installation is the first museum show in the U.S. based on the popular photo sharing app Instagram. Read more about the inception of the Photo Hunt project in stories in The Columbus Dispatch, Art Daily, and Clic France. To see a collection of all the images that have been submitted since the inception of our Photo Hunts, view the CMA Photo Hunt Online Gallery.

We can’t wait to see what you come up with for this next assignment! Happy shooting!

(Photo: Tongues Out, by Rae Russel, 1948, Columbus Museum of Art Photo League Collection)

New CMA Photo Hunt Series

Our CMA Photo Hunts are back! Thanks to all who participated in the first series of CMA Photo Hunts based on our critically acclaimed The Radical Camera exhibition. Altogether we received nearly 900 submissions from more than 100 photographers. The resulting exhibition now on view through December 2012 includes more three dozen photos from nearly two dozen Columbus area photographers. The installation is the first museum show in the U.S. based on the popular photo sharing app Instagram.

This next round of assignments is based on our Making Faces, a family-friendly exhibition currently on view that explores portraits from CMA’s collection, and includes work by Diane Arbus, Roy Lichtenstein, and other noted artists. Watch for biweekly assignments here on our blog, and on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. (Look for additional assignments November 2, 2012; November 16, 2012, November 30, 2012, December 14, 2012, and December 28, 2012).

Here is your first Making Faces Photo Hunt assignment:

  • In the spirit of the Halloween season, capture something that reflects the word “Masks”
  • Tag your work on Instagram with #CMAPhotoHunt and #Masks
  • For this first Making Faces assignment you have until Friday November 02, 2012.
  • Please note: images must be your own. Columbus Museum of Art

Once again our Photography Curator Catherine Evans will select her favorites (based on the most creative entries, and ones that best represent the theme), and your creation could grace the walls at Columbus Museum of Art.

We can’t wait to see what you come up with for this next series of Photo Hunts! Happy shooting!

(Photo: Halloween, South Side by Marvin E. Newman, Columbus Museum of Art Photo League Collection)

12 for 12: Elijah Pierce


Elijah Pierce (1892–1984) was born in Baldwin, Mississippi and took up carving wood after his father gave him his first pocketknife when he was only seven years old. As a young man, Pierce left Mississippi and moved north. Working as both a barber and a preacher, he ultimately settled in Columbus, Ohio in 1924. Today, he is best remembered for the scores of painted wood relief “story-telling” panels that he created between giving haircuts in his barbershop.

Pierce’s Long Street barbershop became a gathering place for the local African-American community as well as a gallery for his work. In the late 1960s, Pierce was discovered by an art world newly interested in the work of folk and self-taught artists. He quickly became something of a celebrity both locally and nationally. In 1982, Pierce traveled to Washington, DC, where he was honored at the Corcoran Gallery of Art at the opening reception of a landmark national exhibition recognizing African-American folk artists. Later that year, the National Endowment for the Arts awarded Pierce the National Heritage Fellowship.

In the year following his death, the Columbus Museum of Art acquired more than one hundred Pierce carvings for its permanent collection. This unique trove has been growing steadily as collectors continue to donate important Pierce carvings to the Museum making CMA’s collection of carvings by Pierce the largest in the world.

See Pierce’s work in person in The Essential Elijah Pierce exhibition now on view at CMA through Spring 2013.

Pierce was an inspiration and mentor to many in the community. Do you have a wonderful memory or story to tell about Pierce? Please share it here in the comments!

CMA Photo Hunts Assignment 9: Home

For the ninth (and last) CMA Photo Hunt assignment here is your assignment:

  • Capture something that reflects the word “Home”
  • Tag your work on Instagram, Twitter, or Flickr with #CMAPhotoHunt and #Home plus your #city.
  • For this last assignment you have until Friday September 7, 2012.

Catherine Evans, our William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography, will select a few of her favorites, and your creation could grace the walls at Columbus Museum of Art come this fall. See what she picked in Round One and Round Two.

CMA Photo Hunts are inspired by our The Radical Camera show and the Photo Leaguers, who challenged themselves with assignments that captured a word or phrase. Through the run of The Radical Camera we’ve been posting new photo assignment challenges. Anyone around the world can participate. Photos you have already taken that fit each assignment, are also encouraged.

To see all the submissions, visit the CMA Photo Hunt Gallery.

(Arnold Eagle, Monhagen Island, Maine (Kerosene Lamp). 1945, Gelatin silver print, Photo League Collection, Museum Purchase with funds provided by Elizabeth M. Ross, the Derby Fund, John S. and Catherine Chapin Kobacker, and the Friends of the Photo League)

Art Speaks. Join the Conversation.

12 for 12: Kojo Kamau Chronicles Columbus

In the next in our 12 for 12 Columbus Bicentennial series honoring Columbus artists from our permanent collection, we highlight photographer Kojo Kamau.

Throughout his life, Kojo Kamau has made major contributions to the vitality of the arts in Columbus. His photographs chronicle Columbus not only as his home, but also as a cultural, artistic, and political crossroads. For five decades, his work has detailed a changing landscape, acknowledging the troubled political and social history of African Americans, but always through a positive lens. Community, travels, portraits of artists and musicians, both local and international, and social issues are constant themes. Kojo was greatly inspired by Elijah Pierce, whom he photographed numerous times (as you can see in the above picture). In addition to his photographic work, Kojo has been an essential, avid activist and supporter of the arts. In 1979 he and his late wife, Mary Ann Williams, founded Art for Community Expression (ACE), a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting the work of African-American artists.

Born Robert Jones in 1939, in 1970 he changed his name to Kojo Kamau, which means “unconquerable quiet one” in Yoruba, one of the many languages spoken in West Africa. He attended the Rochester Institute of Technology, The Ohio State University, and the Columbus College of Art and Design to study photography. From 1964 until 1994 Kojo was the chief photographer for The Ohio State University College of Medicine. Currently he teaches photography at Columbus State Community College.

(Above: Pierce Painting a Carving in His Shop by Kojo Kamau from the Columbus Museum of Art permanent collection).

Art Speaks. Join the Conversation.

 

CMA Photo Hunt Assignment 8: Summer

For the eighth CMA Photo Hunt assignment (and the second to last challenge) here is your assignment:

  • Capture something that reflects the word “Summer”
  • Tag your work on Instagram, Twitter, or Flickr with #CMAPhotoHunt and #Summer plus your #city.
  • For this next assignment you have until Friday August 24, 2012.

Catherine Evans, our William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography, will select a few of her favorites, and your creation could grace the walls at Columbus Museum of Art come this fall. Catherine recently chose another round of her favorites. See what she picked in this Curator’s Choice post. Her choices ranged from an ethereal shot of Scioto Mile to a moving portrait of a veteran.

See how people captured and interpreted all the assignments so far in the CMA Photo Hunt Gallery.

CMA Photo Hunts are inspired by our The Radical Camera show and the Photo Leaguers, who challenged themselves with assignments that captured a word or phrase. Through the run of The Radical Camera we’ve been posting new photo assignment challenges. Anyone around the world can participate. Photos you have already taken that fit each assignment, are also encouraged.

(Photo: Muscle Beach, Santa Monica California,  by Max Yavno, 1949, Columbus Museum of Art, Ohio, Photo League Collection, Museum Purchase with funds provided by Elizabeth M. Ross, the Derby Fund, John S. and Catherine Chapin Kobacker, and the Friends of the Photo League)

Art Speaks. Join the Conversation.

Curator’s Choice: CMA Photo Hunts Round 2

Catherine Evans, our William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography, has selected some of her favorite CMA Photo Hunt submissions out of the hundreds of great entries tagged so far from Round 2. See what she chose from the Community, Pride and Contrast assignments, and why they work so well.

Our CMA Photo Hunt assignments are inspired by our The Radical Camera exhibition and the Photo League, a group of young photographers from the 1930s-1950s who took to the streets with their cameras just as photography was becoming recognized as an art. Their ranks including some of the most well-known photographers of the early to mid-20th century including W. Eugene Smith, Weegee, Lisette Model, Berenice Abbott, Aaron Siskind, Arthur Leipzig, and more.

Catherine’s ultimate favorites from the CMA Photo Hunts will be on display in our Community Gallery this fall.

Community

The little girl appears to have emerged out of a misty alien landscape in this surreal expression of community. The filter only enhances the atmosphere of this scene in this photograph by Rebecca (@reblyen).

 

In this shot by Taker of Photos people are scattered throughout the frame of the photograph with a slight aerial perspective. You can still read the individuals within the group, and the heart in the center is a subtle punctuation mark.

 

A charming and energetic view of a small community on parade from Nick Carron (@urbancurse). The leader in red animates the procession in full stride, while the van remains static in the background.

 

Pride

In this photograph by Liz Celeste (@mamawooste), pride is interpreted in a jar of pickles. A subject not often photographed is elevated to the status of an Old Master still life.

 

In this moving portrait of a veteran by @faytlefoto, black and white gives the subject a kind of gravitas. The creases of his face are elegantly reiterated in the folds of his shirt.

 

This view from the back makes the viewer a participant. The flag askew in the subject’s hair is a poignant detail in this photograph from Taker of Photos.

Contrast

Black and white. Male and female. Priest and nun. Contrast abounds in in this shot from Mitchell (@cbusgodfather).

 

This study in garish color by Tim Courlas (@durtball) demonstrates contrast in an unexpected, stylized way.

 

This photograph by Rebecca (@reblyen) offers an emphatic example of contrast from a worm’s eye view. The light and sliver of space between the buildings give dimension to this Columbus architectural gem.

Can’t wait to see what everyone submits for the last three assignments.

Art Speaks. Join the Conversation.

Catherine Evans, CMA’s William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography

 

12 for 12: Roy Lichtenstein

For the next in our 12 for 12 Columbus Bicentennial series honoring Columbus artists from our permanent collection, we highlight OSU graduate, teacher and Pop Art sensation Roy Lichtenstein.

Roy Lichtenstein was a well-renowned American painter, sculptor and printmaker whose work was heavily influenced by advertising and comics. Lichtenstein attended the Ohio State University earning his BFA in 1951, then set off for Cleveland to work as an art teacher. By the early 1960s Lichtenstein gave up teaching to paint full-time and, WHAM!, become a defining member of the Pop Art Movement.

Lichtenstein drew from comic book themes such as passion, romance, science-fiction, violence and war, and used commercial art methods to create his signature Ben-day dot paintings. Lichtenstein also explored a a variety of historical art periods and transformed other artist’s works such as Pablo Picasso, Gilbert Stuart and Claude Monet. “These rank among the best experiments by any artist in blurring the distinction between high and low art. Lichtenstein is one of the few artists able to be ironic and exuberant at the same time, and nowhere do you feel this more than in his paintings that tweak the history of art,” said Paul Goldberger in Vanity Fair.  Currently The Art Institute of Chicago has a large Lichtenstein retrospective consisting of about 160 of Lichtenstein’s work on display. 

Lichtenstein’s sculpture Brushstrokes in Flight welcomes visitors to Columbus at Port Columbus International Airport.

Interesting Lichtenstein Facts:
•    Lichtenstein used to hide cartoon characters such as Mickey Mouse, Donald Duck and Bugs Bunny, in some of his early paintings.
•    In 1944, Lichtenstein designed a painting for the hull of the United States entry in the America’s Cup yacht race

(Above: Roy Lichtenstein, Modern Head #2 from the CMA permanent collection.)