Tag: art

Gallery of Echoes: Art inspired by Art inspired by Art

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Bierstadt King Lake California

Imagine if you stopped to look at a painting, it unfolds in front of you, moving through space to cover every inch of your vision…Music transforms the brush strokes into melodies and harmonies that become the painting’s soundtrack. And nearby, live performers may experience the work through dance, song, and spoken word.  Art inspired by art inspired by art.

These are the opening words to Gallery of Echoes, a multi-media, multi-disciplinary collaboration between Columbus Museum of Art and Shadowbox Live presented by PNC Arts Alive. According to Stev Guyer, Executive Director of Shadowbox Live, the singular production is the first of its kind.

“We were very excited to work with Shadowbox on this brand new kind of collaboration,” said CMA Executive Director Nannette V. Maciejunes. “Gallery of Echoes is a unique experience that bridges the gap between the visual and the performing arts. It’s like nothing you’ve ever experienced.”

To create Gallery of Echoes, Guyer and fellow members of the band Light selected works of art from the Museum’s collection and composed a 21 song cycle inspired by those works. Next, Chief Video Editor David Whitehouse designed an imaginative video segment inspired both by the visual art and the music written for it. Lastly, Shadowbox Live metaperformers were sprinkled throughout the production. The result is a completely original art form.

“As observers, we too often consider different disciplines of art as completely separate beasts,” said Guyer.  “But all art is connected at very base and very visceral levels.  ’Art inspired by art inspired by art.’  That is what Gallery of Echoes represents.”

Gallery of Echoes opens Thursday, May 1 with performances May 2 – 4. Students, seniors, military, and CMA members receive a $5 discount for all shows, except opening night.  For more information and reservations, call the Shadowbox Live Box Office at 614-416-7625 or go online at www.shadowboxlive.org.

Above: King Lake, California by Albert Bierstadt one of the more than 20 works from CMA’s collection used as inspiration for Shadowbox’s Gallery of Echoes.

Art of Matrimony Gallery

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For more than two thousand years, the ketubbah, or Hebrew marriage contract, has been an integral part of Jewish culture. Found in the homes of married Jews, whether wealthy or poor, scholar or layman, in the West or in the East, ketubbot provide a wealth of information concerning the artistic creativity and cultural interactions of Jewish communities. As testimonies to the sacredness of marriage, works of art, and repositories of Jewish history, these magnificent treasures offer insights and delights in equal measure.

Our Art of Matrimony exhibition (April 1, 2014 – June 15, 2014) features diverse ketubbot dating from the twelfth through the twenty-first centuries.

Join our online gallery of ketubbot by uploading a photo of your decorated marriage contract to Instagram and tag it #CMAketubbah.

6th Brandt Inspired Photo Hunt Challenge

The current round of CMA Photo Hunt assignments are inspired by our now on view Matthew Brandt: Sticky/Dusty/Wet, the first museum show for the hot Los Angeles based photographer. Brandt processes his photos using nontraditional materials such as bubble gum, honey bees, Pop rocks, and more, was recently named by Forbes the “Top 30 under 30 in art and design.”

BubblegumHere in an homage to a classic Ansel Adams shot, Brandt uses bubble gum in the processing. With that in mind, respond with your take on the sixth challenge:

  • Capture something that reflects  “Sticky” either in concept or process
  • Tag your work on Instagram with #CMAPhotoHunt and #Sticky
  • For this sixth assignment you have until Friday December 06, 2013.
  • Please note: images must be your own. Anyone in the world can participate.

Once again our William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography Catherine Evans will select her favorites (based on the most creative entries, and ones that best represent the assignment), and your creation could grace the walls at Columbus Museum of Art. The third CMA Photo Hunt exhibition was on display July-October in our Community Gallery, and featured work inspired by our COLOR exhibition in the Big Idea Gallery.

CMA Photo Hunts are a digital complement to CMA collections and exhibitions, give participants an opportunity to flex their creativity, be inspired by works or themes in Columbus Museum of Art exhibitions or collections, and respond to creative challenges with their own visual take. Since our Photo Hunts began we have received nearly 5,000 submissions from hundreds of photographers from Seattle to Ohio to Paris to Russia. With our first exhibition last fall, we were first museum in the world to present a curated, crowdsourced installation based on the popular photo sharing app Instagram.

Looking forward to seeing your visual response. Happy shooting!

Art Lab, Project Pivot, and Teens at CMA

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If you happened to be in the museum on Wednesdays recently, you may have noticed the surplus of high-school-aged youth engaging in various activities. Project Pivot, the 4-year partnership with the Arts and College Preparatory Academy (artcollegeprep.org), is a high school program that experiments with formal and informal learning. Pivot and Art Lab meet every Wednesday. Pivot in the Studio and Ready Room and Art Lab in the Innovation Lab.

Art Lab, the out-of-school internship kicked off its first day recently with a photo shoot, gallery tour, sound booth intro, and zine workshop. More than 30 teens from four area high schools applied to the program and scheduled interviews with CMA staff. Only 15 were selected to participate, including Art Lab alumni who applied to come back for a second year.

From October until May, teen programming staff and mentors will be pushing teens to re-define what it means to be an artist, either as a profession or a way of existing curiously in the world. Members of the program will be encouraged to evaluate community need, and will be given resources to conceptualize events for museum visitors on our free Sundays.

In mid-November, Kansas City based artist, Sean Starowitz will be working with both Art Lab and Project Pivot on respective program initiatives. One of the reasons Sean was picked to work with our teens, is due to his belief that socially engaged art brings people together in unique ways, which create pathways for meaningful interactions, conversations, and experiences.  Art Lab’s first Social Sunday of the year will be a collaboration between Art Lab teens, CMA staff, Starowitz, and museum-goers alike. Stop in Sunday, November 17 from 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM to see what Art Lab teens have in store.

TeensatCMAThis Thursday November 14 will also be our first Drop-in Studio times for teens from 4:00 PM – 8:00 PM. Teens can hang out together and check out our Studio and Innovation Lab, mess around with Garageband, PhotoShop, a sound booth, and green screens, plus Studio time with art supplies, crafts, and a sewing machine. All are welcome, no registration requested.

Interested in serving on the Teen Event Council? The Teen Council meets monthly on the second Wednesday of each month from 4:30 PM -6:00 PM, rotating between COSI and the Columbus Museum of Art. Contact Morgan Anderson for details.

Art Speaks. Join the Conversation.

Morgan Anderson, Teen Programs Coordinator

3rd Brandt Inspired Crowdsourced CMA Photo Hunt

Third Matthew Brandt inspired crowdsourced CMA Photo Hunt assignment. Hills Creek Lake by Brandy

The current round of CMA Photo Hunt assignments are inspired by our upcoming exhibition Matthew Brandt: Sticky/Dusty/Wet, the first museum show for the hot Los Angeles based photographer. Brandt processes his photos using nontraditional materials such as bubble gum, honey bees, Pop rocks, and more.

Here Brandt uses lake water in his large scale processing. So with that in mind, respond with your take on the third challenge:

  • Capture something that reflects  “Distressed” either in concept or process
  • Tag your work on Instagram with #CMAPhotoHunt and #Distressed
  • For this third assignment you have until Friday October 25, 2013.
  • Please note: images must be your own. Anyone in the world can participate.

Once again our William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography Catherine Evans will select her favorites (based on the most creative entries, and ones that best represent the assignment), and your creation could grace the walls at Columbus Museum of Art. The third CMA Photo Hunt exhibition is on display now through November in our Community Gallery, and features work selected by Evans.

Since our Photo Hunts began we have received nearly 4,000 submissions from hundreds of photographers from Seattle to Ohio to Paris to Russia. With our first exhibition last fall, we were first museum in the world to present a curated, crowdsourced installation based on the popular photo sharing app Instagram.

Watch for additional biweekly Photo Hunt assignments here on our blog, and on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

(Hills Creek Lake, OR 3, 2009 by Matthew Brandt)

Art and Ice Cream: Q&A with Jeni of Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams

Jeni Britton Bauer

Recently we caught up with Jeni Britton Bauer, James Beard award-winning cookbook author and founder of Columbus-based Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams to get her take on art, thinking like an artist, and her inspiration for creating an ice cream tribute to George Bellows.

Why does art matter to you?
Art answers the emotional Why? When I dig deep to find out, I gain new perspective. It’s time travel.  Why this? Why that? Why now? Why him?

What role does art play in your life?
It expands into the cracks and fills the gaps. Art helps me draw conclusions and make connections. When I think, I use all parts of my brain. It’s like when you work out, if you worked only one arm, you would have one big arm and one small one. Artistic thinking, which is not necessarily creative thinking, is a vital part of my thought process.

In ice cream I use art thinking when I decide what I’ll do with, say, a raspberry. Raspberries are a beautiful and perfect fruit in color, texture and flavor. There is nothing better than a raspberry and nothing you can add to a raspberry to make it more perfect. I can honor a raspberry by making a sorbet with as little else as possible. Just a bit of sugar. Pulverized. This is art because I have chosen to leave it almost in it’s original form. If I added tarragon to it, or mint, or even honey, which seem like fine things to do, I would have distracted the flavor. Because you can’t make a raspberry better or even more interesting. However, in a sorbet form, rather than a whole raspberry, the flavor is pink-red, and surprisingly grassy, a little tart and a bit sweet, a tiny bit biting and bitter. Things you may not even notice when chomping on a fresh berry.

Anything that a raspberry touches is given a kick in the pants. Think of a simple cake with raspberry sorbet melting into the crumb, or a rich chocolate cake. A scoop of dense raspberry sorbet plopped into a cup of Watershed gin with a sprig of lavender hanging off the rim (you smell it as you bring it to your nose), is the ice and the mixer in a fresh cocktail I call Rouge Your Knees. I can make fresh raspberries into a sauce and swirl it through a soft farmstead cheese ice cream. Raspberries become a tool in my ice cream arsenal to make softer flavors sing. I may use the sorbet to pop other flavors, but I’ll never add something other than a touch of sugar to the raspberries. They are perfect already.

Art answers why. Just because you put something together, should you? If you ask yourself this question about everything you do, art will play a big part of your life, too.

How are food and art alike?
They are both essential for survival.

What about George Bellows inspires you?
I am lucky to have seen the Bellows show at the National Gallery in Washington D.C and again at the Met in NYC. To see so many of his pieces here in his hometown is really wonderful. To see the paintings all together was life changing to me. I truly fell for George Bellows. I spent hours visiting the paintings. I jumped into them, especially the New York scenes. I love to compare his work to Winslow Homer, another of my favorite painters. I think that George Bellows’ work is edgier, it’s tougher, it’s bolder, and harder to take in, and that’s what makes it so strong for me. You can read his faces in his portraits. You can smell the air in his landscapes. You can feel the salt on your cheeks when you see the spray of the wave in his seascapes. And you begin to feel what his subjects felt. Some were suffering or struggling and the way he paints them you feel their struggles. Often the faces are smudges of many colors of paint, but they come through vividly, as if I know them personally. I also love the colors that are in each painting. If you look closely you will find may colors.

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Tell us about how you created the George Bellows flavor
My great grandparents had a big old house in Maine that I visited when I was 9 years old. It had secret passages behind walls, the kind where you pull the candlestick and the wall opens up. Those passages were hiding spots and escape routes on one of the last stops on the Underground Railroad. You could get all the way out to the back of the property through the wall of the living room. When you emerged, you would be in the middle of an old graveyard. Spooky. That summer I spent time frolicking in the cold New England waters. I ate salt water taffy, iced coffee and lobster for the first time. There is something about Maine that I got a glimpse of that summer that has stayed with me all these years, and that I revisit in Bellows’ paintings of the sea, especially the painting Churn and Break, which also has a name that sounds like an ice cream flavor. The sea churns, the ice cream churns.

It’s not just the sea that is salty, it’s the air. I wanted the ice cream to taste like salt water taffy. And we use salt from the sea, so the ice cream has that flavor. The cookies are colored to match specific parts of the waves. Inside you will find a fresh plum sauce. They are in season in Ohio, so it’s good timing, but it also adds the deep purple color of the rocks in the painting. I also think that plums have a salty scent to them. That’s hard to imagine, but it’s true. Even plum blossoms smell salty to me. So Sea Salt and Plum Jam was my tribute to George Bellows’ painting Churn and Break.

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How does the Columbus community incubate creativity?
I make a distinction between art and creativity. Creativity has very little to do with art. You can be an artist and not be an especially creative thinker (as my raspberry example above). But, I’m not convinced that you can be a scientist without being a creative thinker. So let’s all agree that creativity is very important. It’s important for artists, scientists, mathletes, farmers, chefs, and moms and dads. If you can’t think creatively then you rob yourself and your community of the ability to change the world.

When you encounter a brick wall, you may turn around. I see potential in a brick wall, I see opportunity. Sometimes I can get over it, sometimes I can knock it down. And I get to reap the benefits of what’s on the other side. Creativity is seeing potential and opportunity where others don’t.

So how do we nurture this in Columbus? We are lucky to have such incredible art museums, fountains, parks, devoted musicians, and playthings. We are lucky to have artists living here and to have entire districts devoted to art. But let’s do better because it’s important. Kids used to learn to draw in school. Really draw. Now we don’t. Drawing is important because it can help you explain things to people. It can help you work through a problem. I think everyone should learn to draw. It’s like I said above, if you only learned math and science then it’s like a body builder who only works out one arm and one leg. We have to do a better job nurturing whole brain thinkers. That has to start in kindergarten and before. Art incubates creative thinking because it forces you to move emotions and thoughts through your body and finger tips and transpose them onto paper, canvas, or other mediums.

Who are some of your favorite artists?
Frank Stella, George Bellows, Matisse, Picasso, Gauguin, Wayne Thiebaud, Richard Diebenkorn, and my daughter Greta.

George Bellows and the American Experience will remain on view at CMA through January 4, 2014. Jeni’s Sea Salt and Plum Jam Bellows-inspired ice cream will be served exclusively at our annual Art Celebration and ArtFUSION on October 19, 2013.

Art Madness 2013 Final Four

Art Madness 2013 Final Four

We’re down to the Final Four of Art Madness, our version of March Madness for Art Lovers. It’s been a strong run for the Americans in Art Madness 2013. Three of the Final Four teams are works by American artists, including Edward Hopper’s Morning Sun, which in the first round took out The Breakfast by Edgar Degas, last year’s Art Madness champion; American Impressionist Mary Cassatt’s Portrait of a Young Woman, which won handily over work by fellow Impressionist Pierre-Auguste Renoir and then art giant Peter Paul Rubens; and Charles Demuth’s Aucassin and Nicolette, which first beat work by German Expressionist Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, then work by Dutch Still Life artist Carstian Luyckx. German Expressionist Emile Nolde’s Sunflowers in Windstorm is the sole nonAmerican in the Final Four.

Who will be crowned the Art Madness Champion? It’s all up to you! Vote on our Facebook page by liking your favorite from the Art Madness Match of the Day, or in person in our lobby (in person votes are worth double!). The artwork with the most votes/likes by the next day will advance to the Championship Match, which will take place starting Saturday April 6, 2013 -Monday April 9, 2013. We’ll announce the winner on Tuesday April 10, 2013.

Art Madness Final Schedule
April 4, 2013
Final Four Match 1: Portrait of a Young Woman by Mary Cassatt vs. Sunflowers in the Windstorm by Emile Nolde.

April 5, 2013
Final Four Match 2: Morning Sun by Edward Hopper vs Aucassin and Nicolette by Charles Demuth

April 6, 2013-April 9, 2013
Art Madness Championship Match: tbd

Art Madness Returns

Art Madness 2013

Art Madness is back. For the second year we’re pleased to present Art Madness, our version of March Madness for Art Lovers.

To put together our bracket, we selected some of the most beloved works of art from our collection, as well as a few lesser known gems.

It’s Old Masters versus Contemporary; Europeans versus Americans. Who will be a bracket buster? Who will come from behind and be the Cinderella of Art Madness? Who will be crowned the Art Madness Champion? It’s all up to you!

Here’s how to play along. During the run of Art Madness, we will post a new Match of the Day on our Facebook page. Vote on Facebook by liking your favorite from the Art Madness Match of the Day, or in person in our lobby (in person votes are worth double!). The artwork with the most votes/likes by the next day will advance on to the next round.

Want to predict the winners and keep track of the matches? Download the Art Madness Bracket.

SCOUTING REPORT ON THE 2013 ART MADNESS TEAMS

Hopper
Morning Sun
by Edward Hopper
This standout from our American collection is back from the Grand Palais in Paris and the blockbuster Edward Hopper retrospective, which beat even Picasso in attendance figures. Our highly requested Hopper is back home in our newly reinstalled American galleries, and is considered the number one seed in this year’s competition.
Degas
The Breakfast
by Edgar Degas
This work by master draftsman and Impressionist Degas was the 2012 Art Madness Champion. Here Degas explores with intensity and pleasure the potential of pastel for spontaneous, sensuous expression. Will this Degas masterpiece from our renowned Sirak Collection take home the championship again?
Van Dyck
Christian Bruce, Countess of Devon
by Anthony van Dyck
This work by premier British painter Anthony van Dyck remains true to the roots of portrait painting during the time of Charles I of England. Will van Dyck’s aristocratic painting rise above the competition?
Stamos
Ancestral
by Theodoros Stamos
Stamos was part of the Abstact Expressionist group known as the Irascibles, which included such heavy hitters as Jackson Pollock and Mark Rothko, and other hard-driving artists who really made their mark on the art world. This mutable piece by Stamos is included in our big Mark Rothko exhibition, now on view.
Demuth
Aucassin and Nicolette
by Charles Demuth
This modernized idea of love by Demuth is based on a French love story and fable.  Here Demuth uses the clean lines of the smokestacks in his anthropomorphic telling of the tale. Will Demuth’s clever, modern take on love prevail?
Kirchner
Landscape at Fehmarn with Nudes
by Ernst Ludwig Kirchner
In this sensuous painting by German Expressionist Kirchner, you get the sense that the people and nature are one. Kirchner’s work at first may seem primitive and loose, but there is a definite game plan going on here.
Luyckx
Still Life with Lobster
by Carstian Luyckx
Dutch still life painter Luyckx depicts a neverending feast for the eyes here. Just like a clever team that can adjust its game, every time you look at this still life, you seem something you didn’t see before.
Baziotes
Woman at Window
by William Baziotes
Baziotes was also part of the Abstract Expressionist group known as the Irascibles, and this piece from our permanent collection is included in the coda to our currently on view Mark Rothko exhibition. Will Baziotes’ power riff on Picasso rule the day?
Cassatt
Portrait of a Young Woman
by Mary Cassatt
American Impressionist Cassatt was the only American ever invited to participate in the groundbreaking French Impressionist exhibitions in Paris. She represented her conference well with pieces such as this striking pastel, a nod to the techniques of her mentor Degas.
Renoir
Christine Lerolle Embroidering
by Pierre-Auguste Renoir
Impressionist giant Renoir fuses Impressionist techniques with that of the Old Masters in this work from our renowned Sirak collection. Analysis: knows how to mix-it up in the paint.
Rubens
Christ Triumphant Over Sin and Death
by Peter Paul Rubens and Studio
Rubens is one of the most important painters of all-time and with this powerful, positive painting of a heroic Christ figure he proves why he’s one of the top seeds.
Tolson
Adam and Eve
by Edgar Tolson.
Modern-day folk artist Tolson remains true to the craft with this depiction of Adam and Eve in his “Fall of Man” series.  The Appalachian folk artist gained much acclaim for his work, including a “tournament invite” to the Whitney Biennial.
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Sylvan Lake, SD3 from the series Lakes and Reservoirs *
by Matthew Brandt
Los Angeles-based photographer Brandt (whose work will be part of a solo exhibition at CMA later this year) is known for experimenting with unusual materials such as Cheez Whiz and Kool-Aid. In this new CMA acquisition, Brandt uses lake water to soak the Chromogenic print.
Vien
Venus Wounded by Diomedes, is Saved by Iris
by Joseph-Marie Vien
French painter Vien coined the French neoclassical style. This dramatic work by Vien is likely to deliver in the clutch. Will this piece by Vien be the Cinderella story of Art Madness?
Bellows
Cornfield and Harvest
by George Bellows
Columbus’ Bellows, an OSU athlete and one of the preeminent artists of the Ashcan School, was known for depicting action scenes, but here he shows his softer side and Midwest roots. Like his Ohio State alma mater he’s likely to go far in the tournament. Homecourt advantage: Bellows.
Nolde
Sunflowers in Windstorm
by Emile Nolde
One of the most recognizable and loved pieces from our Sirak Collection holds one of the top seeds. Something about Nazi oppression brought out the best in Nolde. His passion and tenacity, as symbolized here, make his work hard to beat.

(*Matthew Brandt image from the series Lakes and Reservoirs Sylvan Lake, SD 3, 2012, Chromogenic print soaked in Sylvan Lake water, Unique. © Matthew Brandt, Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York)

Art Speaks. Join the Conversation.

Czech Puppets Behind the Scenes

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Our Strings Attached: The Living History of Czech Puppets exhibition opens today. Thanks to our Curator Carole Genshaft, who documented the installation, you can see how the exhibition came together (from the unpacking and uncrating to putting the Czech puppets together). These rare objects are presented thanks to an international collaboration between Columbus Museum of Art, the Arts and Theatre Institute, Prague and the College of Arts and Sciences at The Ohio State University.

More than 140 puppets and set designs are included in the Czech puppets exhibition, many of the puppet designs influenced by fairy tales, literature, and art influences such as surrealism and the Bauhaus, and more.

Since the late nineteenth century, Czech artists have been fascinated by the creative possibilities of puppets. Artists in opera, ballet, dance, drama, and film— who are not originally puppeteers—have used puppets to enhance their artistic expression. The use of string puppets by contemporary artist Petr Nikl and stop-motion filmmakers Jan Švankmajer, Jiří Trnka,  and Jiří Barta (all of their work is included in the show), and many others, demonstrates the increasingly vibrant legacy of traditional Czech puppetry. These and other European artists have influenced stop-motion animated filmmakers the world over including, Americans Tim Burton and the Brothers Quay. In addition to film techniques incorporating puppetry, Burton’s The Nightmare before Christmas (1993) and his latest film Frankenweenie (2012) and the Brothers Quay The Cabinet of Jan Švankmajer (1984) and The Street of Crocodiles (1986) reflect the dark, gothic quality that permeates many, popular Czech puppet and stage productions. Judging from the success of contemporary Broadway productions such as The Lion King (1997), Avenue Q (2003) and Warhorse(2007), Americans are embracing puppetry just as their Czech counterparts have done for centuries.