Tag: art

Making Faces Photo Assignment 4

This next round of Photo Hunt assignments are based on Making Faces, our exhibition currently on view in the Family Gallery that explores portraits from CMA’s collection, and includes work by Diane Arbus, Roy Lichtenstein, Miro, and other noted artists. Watch for biweekly assignments here on our blog, and on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. (Look for more assignments December 14, 2012, and December 28, 2012).

Here is your fourth Making Faces CMA Photo Hunt assignment:

  • Capture something that reflects the word double.
  • Tag your work on Instagram with #CMAPhotoHunt and #Double
  • Tag by midnight Friday December 14, 2012.
  • Please note: images must be your own; while preference may be given to Ohio-based photographers, anyone in the world can participate.

Once again our Photography Curator Catherine Evans will select her favorites (based on the most creative entries, and ones that best represent the theme), and your creation could be part of the next CMA Photo Hunt installation this January 2013. (We’ll be selecting from the first few assignments in mid-December.)

Altogether we received nearly 900 submissions from more than 100 photographers from the first round of CMA Photo Hunts. The resulting exhibition now on view through December 31, 2012 includes more three dozen photos from nearly two dozen Columbus area photographers. The installation is the first museum show in the U.S. based on the popular photo sharing app Instagram. Read more about the inception of the Photo Hunt project in stories in The Columbus Dispatch, Art Daily, and Clic France, and Columbus Alive, and view the NBC4 story.

To see a collection of all the images that have been submitted since the inception of our Photo Hunts, view the CMA Photo Hunt Online Gallery.

Be sure to follow us on Instagram at columbusmuseum where we’ll also be highlighting some of our favorites. We can’t wait to see what you come up with!

(Photo: Identical Twins, Roselle, NJ, 1967, by Diane Arbus. On loan from the private collection of Tim and Libby Tarrier for our Making Faces exhibition).

Making Faces Photo Hunt Assignment 3

This next round of Photo Hunt assignments are based on Making Faces, our exhibition currently on view in the Family Gallery that explores portraits from CMA’s collection, and includes work by Diane Arbus, Roy Lichtenstein, Miro, and other noted artists. Watch for biweekly assignments here on our blog, and on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. (Look for additional assignments November 30, 2012, December 14, 2012, and December 28, 2012).

Here is your third Making Faces CMA Photo Hunt assignment:

  • Capture something that reflects what family means to you.
  • Tag your work on Instagram with #CMAPhotoHunt and #Family
  • Tag by midnight Friday November 30, 2012.
  • Please note: images must be your own; while preference may be given to Ohio-based photographers, anyone in the world can participate.

Once again our Photography Curator Catherine Evans will select her favorites (based on the most creative entries, and ones that best represent the theme), and your creation could be part of the next CMA Photo Hunt installation this January 2013. (We’ll be selecting from the first few assignments in mid-December.)

Altogether we received nearly 900 submissions from more than 100 photographers from the first round of CMA Photo Hunts. The resulting exhibition now on view through December 31, 2012 includes more three dozen photos from nearly two dozen Columbus area photographers. The installation is the first museum show in the U.S. based on the popular photo sharing app Instagram. Read more about the inception of the Photo Hunt project in stories in The Columbus Dispatch, Art Daily, and Clic France, as well as view the NBC4 story.

To see a collection of all the images that have been submitted since the inception of our Photo Hunts, view the CMA Photo Hunt Online Gallery.

Be sure to follow us on Instagram at columbusmuseum where we’ll also be highlighting some of our favorites. We can’t wait to see how you express yourself with this next assignment!

(Photo: Flower Girl with her Mother and Grandmother, Mundelien, Illinois, 1996, by Melissa Ann Pinney. Gift of Joanne and Richard Press, Boston).

New CMA Photo Hunt Series

Our CMA Photo Hunts are back! Thanks to all who participated in the first series of CMA Photo Hunts based on our critically acclaimed The Radical Camera exhibition. Altogether we received nearly 900 submissions from more than 100 photographers. The resulting exhibition now on view through December 2012 includes more three dozen photos from nearly two dozen Columbus area photographers. The installation is the first museum show in the U.S. based on the popular photo sharing app Instagram.

This next round of assignments is based on our Making Faces, a family-friendly exhibition currently on view that explores portraits from CMA’s collection, and includes work by Diane Arbus, Roy Lichtenstein, and other noted artists. Watch for biweekly assignments here on our blog, and on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. (Look for additional assignments November 2, 2012; November 16, 2012, November 30, 2012, December 14, 2012, and December 28, 2012).

Here is your first Making Faces Photo Hunt assignment:

  • In the spirit of the Halloween season, capture something that reflects the word “Masks”
  • Tag your work on Instagram with #CMAPhotoHunt and #Masks
  • For this first Making Faces assignment you have until Friday November 02, 2012.
  • Please note: images must be your own. Columbus Museum of Art

Once again our Photography Curator Catherine Evans will select her favorites (based on the most creative entries, and ones that best represent the theme), and your creation could grace the walls at Columbus Museum of Art.

We can’t wait to see what you come up with for this next series of Photo Hunts! Happy shooting!

(Photo: Halloween, South Side by Marvin E. Newman, Columbus Museum of Art Photo League Collection)

CMA Photo Hunt Gallery

Originally inspired by our critically acclaimed The Radical Camera show and the Photo League, our CMA Photo Hunt assignments are an opportunity to flex your creative muscle. Since our Photo Hunts began we have received thousands of submissions from hundreds of mobile photographers from Seattle to Ohio to Paris to Russia. With our first exhibition in fall of 2012, we were first museum in the world to present a curated, crowdsourced installation based on the popular photo sharing app Instagram. Read more on the fourth CMA Photo Hunt exhibition inspired by Matthew Brandt, sticky/dusty/wet, the first solo museum show from the hot LA photographer. And be sure to watch for new assignments soon on the CMA blog and Instagram. Anyone in the world can participate.

Read more about the inception of the Photo Hunt project in stories in The Columbus Dispatch, Art Daily, and Clic France, and Columbus Alive.

Take a look at the many creative entries since CMA Photo Hunts began.

#CMAPhotoHunt via Instagram

#CMAPhotoHunt via Twitter

#CMAPhotoHunt via Flickr

Currently there are no photos in this stream.

Art Madness

Introducing Art Madness, our version of March Madness for Art Lovers. To put together our bracket we selected some of our most beloved pieces from four of our strongest collections, as well as a few sleepers. It’s Photography versus Contemporary. Europeans versus the Americans. The Renaissance Region versus the Impressionism Region. Ashcan School Region versus Abstract Expressionism Region. Who will be a bracket buster? Who will come from behind and be the Cinderella of Art Madness? Who will be crowned the Art Madness champion? That’s all up to you. Each day we’ll have a new pairing on Facebook. The artwork with the most likes by the next day at noon will advance on to the next round.

Want to keep track of the winners? Download the Art Madness Bracket.

Please note: just like the NCAA Tournament, the Region a team competes in may be different. i.e. O’Keeffe is not a Renaissance painter. That’s just the region she’s competing in.

SCOUTING REPORT ON THE ART MADNESS TEAMS


A Lady with a Parrot and a Gentleman with a Monkey
by Caspar NetscherDutch portrait artist Netscher’s work is often cited as
a perennial fan favorite among the Columbus Museum of Art permanent collection. Here he uses the penchant for symbolism to great effect: oysters as aphrodisiacs, a feather to indicate pleasure, a monkey to indicate lust.

Autumn Leaves – Lake George, N.Y.
by Georgia O’KeeffePerhaps the most famous female artist of all time, O’Keeffe is a strong contender to win the Big Dance. She changed the art world with her emphasis on color, shape, clean lines, and close-ups that fell somewhere between representation and abstraction like this painting of leaves from her summer home with her husband, photographer Alfred Stieglitz.

Sidewalk Clock, NYC
by Ida Wyman

Wyman was one of the nearly 100 female photographers of the Photo League, the pioneering documentary photo movement of the 1930s and 1940s. Here Wyman captures the movement and rhythm of the city. Analysis: really knows how to pace her game.


Three Piece Reclining Figure: Draped
by Henry Moore

England’s most famous sculptor is known for his sometimes surreal and sensuous sculptures like this iconic piece on the front lawn of the Columbus Museum of Art. Talk about tough: this art can withstand snow, sleet, and heavy winds, and may be hard to beat down the stretch.


Playing Cards and Glass of Beer
by Juan GrisSpanish painter, sculptor, compatriot of Picasso, Gris, was one of one of the founding members of the Cubism movement. Here Gris really pulls his team together with a collage-style painting constructed of real objects combined with painted ones.

Polo at Lakewood
by George BellowsColumbus homeboy Bellows, an OSU athlete and one of the preeminent artists of the Ashcan School, was known for depicting scenes of action like this one, where his slashing brushstrokes contrast with the genteel nature of the crowd. Like his Ohio State alma mater he’s likely to go far in the tournament.

Nocturne Navigator
by Alison SaarThe “Blue Lady” as this artwork is nicknamed, was commissioned by the Columbus Museum of Art as a commemoration to the Underground Railroad. It’s a powerhouse piece beloved by the Columbus community.

Coney Island
by Sid GrossmanGrossman advanced his passion for photography through the Photo League, the pioneering documentary photography movement he founded. He was often cited for his belief that photography could change the world. Grossman’s work (as well as Wyman’s) will be on display as part of our upcoming Radical Camera exhibition, which the New York Times calls “stirring.”

The Swimmer
by Yasuo KuniyoshiJapanese American Kuniyoshi takes his cue from the strong lines and low key colors of 18th- and 19th- century Japanese art. The swimmer is an allusion to bas reliefs of ancient Egypt and Assyria in which sea nymphs often swim among water plants. Will this piece swim its way to victory?

The Breakfast
by Edgar DegasMaster draftsman and Impressionist Degas explored with intensity and pleasure the potential of pastel for spontaneous, sensuous expression. This piece from our renowned Sirak Collection may be quiet and peaceful, however in the art world it remains a beloved, tough contender.

Andalusia
by Henri Cartier-BressonFrench photographer Bresson began as a Cubist painter, and was drawn into the circle of the French surrealists. He’s definitely a clutch player, able to capture what he calls “the decisive moment,” as in this photograph where the boys appear to be enveloped in graffiti.

A Street Called Home
by Aminah RobinsonHometown hero and MacArthur Genius Grant recipient Aminah Robinson combines traditional art materials with found objects and everyday materials such as buttons, cloth, leather, twigs, shells, and music box workings. She often works on pieces she calls RagGonNons, art that often takes years to research and continues to evolve as others respond to the works. Home court advantage: Robinson.

Composition with Flames
by Jackson PollockPassionate Pollock revolutionized the art world with his Abstract Expressionist style. The man put his whole body into his painting, which eventually became known as Action Painting. Enough said.

Jill and I
by Tina BarneyConsider Barney the Harvard of the art world. Barney portrays intimate portraits of upper class family and friends like in this haunting photograph. Will Barney and her work be the Cinderella story of Art Madness?

Cornice
by George TookerTooker’s paintings were often psychologically charged, haunting, and mysterious. He was known as a magic realist combining real life with fantasy. Does Tooker’s work have what it takes to go all the way?

Schokko with a Red Hat
by Alexaj JawlenskyJawlensky was a former Russian army officer turned Expressionist painter, and key member of the Blue Rider, an influential group of Russian emigrants and German artists in the early 1900s that also included Jawlensky’s compatriot Kandinsky. Schokko may just ride all the way to victory.

Art Speaks. Join the Conversation.

Critical Thinking & Art

What would you say if someone asked you, “What really matters to you?” It seems like that might be a straightforward question, but take a moment to think about it. Now think about what you might have said when you were in the 7th grade …

This is the second year I’ve had the opportunity to co-teach with the social studies teachers at the Columbus Collegiate Academy. This small charter school serves around 100 middle school students from Columbus’s urban center. Due to a generous grant from Chase Bank, we have been able to partner with this school and create a program entitled “Critical Works” that utilizes art to foster critical thinking, collaboration, communication and creativity.

We start by asking the students what critical thinking looks like. What do you do when you are being critical? When you are thinking? One student responded, “I hear the root word ‘critic,’ so you’re being a critic and forming an opinion.” To my question about thinking one student said, “You are expanding your view of the world.” Throughout my time with the teachers and students at CCA, I have considered myself a co-learner. As I ask the students to think, form an opinion, question, take risks, I am doing this along side them as a teacher. We bring a selection of prints to the school that deal with social issues such as inequality, poverty, oppression and race relations. I was impressed with the connections the students were able to make to historical events, literature, and our modern culture.

If you haven’t heard Steve Johnson’s TED talk, “Where Good Ideas Come From” it is worth a look. He explains how ideas come from conversation … not in isolation. I can see this in the classroom when the students are debating and analyzing the art works. When looking at Thomas Hart Benton’s print entitled “Jessie and Jake,” the discussion went from Little Red Riding Hood, to child abduction to No Child Left Behind.

The students are asked to make a statement about a social issue that really matters to them. It surprised me that these students had very little trouble coming up with issues that they cared about. One student wrote about the ways African-Americans are portrayed negatively in the media. Other students chose issues such as gang violence, bullying, and immigration. The teachers held class debates and we spent time brainstorming, discussing the issues and gathering research.

For the final project the students created hand-printed flags that make a statement about their social issue. We asked students to consider words and symbols that would communicate their message, and also where they would install their flag to have the greatest impact.

When we asked Catera where she wanted to install her flag about HIV AIDS, her reply was, “Well, at first I told my mom I was going to put it on her car … but she said I wasn’t going to put it on her car, so I’ll put it on my dad’s car.”

Well, art is often controversial so I take that as a measure of success.

Over the past 18 months, in preparation for opening CMA’s new Center for Creativity (on Jan. 1, 2011), the entire education staff immersed ourselves in research on creativity, particularly what is necessary to cultivate creativity.  Musings from the Center for Creativity is an opportunity for us to share our thoughts on this topic.  Please share your views and resources with us, as well.

Art Speaks. Join the Conversation.

Emily Reiser, Educator for Family Programs

CMA Celebrates Columbus

For the Columbus Bicentennial, Columbus Museum of Art is asking the community to join 200Columbus and the Columbus Bicentennial celebration by creating your own photograph, painting, sculpture, poem, drawing, or other work inspired by the people or places in our community. Is there a landmark that signifies Columbus for you? A Columbus neighborhood that holds fond memories? An out of the way place you’d like others to discover? Has there been someone in the community who has inspired you? A moment that crystalizes what Columbus means to you?

Create your own artistic interpretation of who and what Columbus is as a city then upload a photograph of the work to our
CMA Celebrates Columbus group
on Flickr. Throughout the year, the Museum will be highlight submissions through blogs, social media channels and events to show what a vibrant, creative place Columbus is to live and work. Join the CMA Celebrates Columbus Flickr group and upload images of your work inspired by Columbus. Add any appropriate tags that might identify your work.

Need some inspiration? Check out CMA’s Columbus Views exhibition on view through May 27, 2012.

We’re looking forward to seeing your creative masterpieces.

Art Speaks. Join the Conversation.

Jennifer Poleon, Digital Communications Manager