Tag: Columbus

In the Arms of the Willow

WillowWeb2

How does one go about turning a Monet into music? Behind the scenes of Gallery of Echoes with Shadowbox’s Gabriel Guyer.

My name is Gabriel Guyer. I am 35 years old and the Bassist and Co-Composer for the Gallery of Echoes project, a multi-media, multi-disciplinary collaboration between Columbus Museum of Art and Shadowbox Live. I have been a Musician and Visual Artist my entire life. Gallery of Echoes in many ways is this fascinating culmination of my life’s experiences. Though I know this isn’t nearly the climax of my existence or my life as an artist, bringing these 2 art forms together in such a unique way is an event I have somehow always been moving towards.

I grew up in a house filled with Classic Rock from the 60s, 70s and 80s like The Doors, Steely Dan, Rush, Jimi, Zeppelin, etc. As I got older my tastes expanded into other genres of music like Soul, R & B and went deep into Rap and Hip Hop for a very long time while dabbling in Classical, Jazz, Lounge and World music along the way.

As a musician I began my life as a Vocalist. I picked up my first stringed instrument, the Violin, in the 4th grade. Soon after I switched to Trombone and stayed with it for several years. However as I reached High School I picked up the Guitar. Being a teenage male with a guitar taught me a lot about songwriting and how to express myself emotionally through my instrument (laugh). Several years later while working in the early days of Shadowbox Live, we lost our bass player. Out of necessity – though perhaps destiny – I picked it up and haven’t put it down since. It speaks for me and from my heart better than any other musical instrument I’ve ever touched.

As an artist, I grew up in a house that was filled with my mother’s Watercolors and Acrylics. She had a gift for sharing her imagination and feelings through abstract work – using mainly art nouveau and still life. Very expressive and very feminine works. I use pen and pencils in my Visual Art, but I have explored many various mediums throughout my life. I’ve never been a painter; in fact I’m terrible at it, so consequently it’s one of the mediums that fascinates me the most.

Perhaps needless to say, Art and Music have been two of the most import factors in my life.

French Impressionism has influenced me since I was young and Claude Monet has inspired and enlightened me through all of that time. For me, Monet’s work has always felt light and inviting. … the way that he could turn an everyday something or somewhere into a place that you wanted to be. He takes you into that world. As you stand at a distance looking at the whole picture, all you want is to be closer. You want to see more detail. But as you draw near, instead of revealing these details you see brushstrokes and texture. This almost blurred vision seems to help the piece to surround and envelop you.

I have seen many of Monet’s works and have been blessed to see several in person. I certainly do not know his entire catalogue of work. However from my experience, Weeping Willow is a very unique piece that the Columbus Museum of Art is lucky to have.

I had never seen a Monet like this before. It was very dark. As I walked up to this piece, explored its colors, and compared it to what I know of Monet – all I could think about was the intense and deep emotion he was expressing. Though I believe Monet is actually inviting us, the viewers, to this safe place where we may comfortably share the darker parts of ourselves.

As I came into writing the music for this piece, I really wanted to speak to each of these elements. The main time signature for the song accompanying this piece is an alternating 7/8 to 8/8 that feels good but is slightly off kilter. That directly speaks to my comparison this piece to his other works.

I also felt a somber, minor tone coming from the painting, which had something of an unexpected flow to it. It seemed like the perfect opportunity to use my chorus pedal and give it that fat, wavy tone to match the natural behavior of the piece.

The main guitar line was a perfect compliment to my languid bass line with each quick 16th note creating tiny, individual leaves on the limbs that tumbled down.

The keys fleshed out our environment with one laying the foundation of rolling hills that we don’t see in the actual artwork but are merely implied. All while the other keyboard creates a gentle breeze that moves the limbs slightly and invites you to come inside for your self-expression.

As we move into the heavier section of the song, it represents the emotion trapped within the weep of the willow. We have stepped under the canopy and are taking our moment to scream and release all of our anger and pain.

Now that we’ve let it out, we can begin to rebuild our confidence and courage – coming back out from beneath its branches. This leads us into my quiet solo section.  Here I tried to communicate the feeling of regrouping and just beginning to take new chances emerging and looking at the world with new eyes. You feel good. You feel lighter.

As the song flows into its outro, I see it as looking back to where our experience began and feeling the call of the willow as we did when we first stumbled across its path.

Perhaps not every song in Gallery of Echoes has given me the illumination that I feel with Weeping Willow, but every song most certainly has its own, unique experience. I truly believe that we, Light‘s performers and composers, have found a new and provocative way to express these wonderful works of art. I hope you will come share our interpretation. And perhaps you will have your own interpretations that wildly differ from ours, but that is exactly what this performance is meant to celebrate. The most beautiful thing about art is that it can be seen and felt in so many different ways.

I was able to smuggle out a rough copy of the recording to share with you. Please know this isn’t a finished product, but it will definitely help you understand the vision we have.

Weeping Willow by Light

Art inspired by art inspired by art.

Gallery of Echoes has only 7 performances at Shadowbox Live from May 1st – 4th

To get your tickets or more information on Gallery of Echoes, please visit the Shadowbox Live website. For more about Gabriel Guyer, visit the author’s website.

Art Speaks. Join the Conversation.

Guest Blogger, Gabriel Guyer, Bassist and Co-Composer for Gallery of Echoes

Gallery of Echoes: Art inspired by Art inspired by Art

Featured

Bierstadt King Lake California

Imagine if you stopped to look at a painting, it unfolds in front of you, moving through space to cover every inch of your vision…Music transforms the brush strokes into melodies and harmonies that become the painting’s soundtrack. And nearby, live performers may experience the work through dance, song, and spoken word.  Art inspired by art inspired by art.

These are the opening words to Gallery of Echoes, a multi-media, multi-disciplinary collaboration between Columbus Museum of Art and Shadowbox Live presented by PNC Arts Alive. According to Stev Guyer, Executive Director of Shadowbox Live, the singular production is the first of its kind.

“We were very excited to work with Shadowbox on this brand new kind of collaboration,” said CMA Executive Director Nannette V. Maciejunes. “Gallery of Echoes is a unique experience that bridges the gap between the visual and the performing arts. It’s like nothing you’ve ever experienced.”

To create Gallery of Echoes, Guyer and fellow members of the band Light selected works of art from the Museum’s collection and composed a 21 song cycle inspired by those works. Next, Chief Video Editor David Whitehouse designed an imaginative video segment inspired both by the visual art and the music written for it. Lastly, Shadowbox Live metaperformers were sprinkled throughout the production. The result is a completely original art form.

“As observers, we too often consider different disciplines of art as completely separate beasts,” said Guyer.  “But all art is connected at very base and very visceral levels.  ’Art inspired by art inspired by art.’  That is what Gallery of Echoes represents.”

Gallery of Echoes opens Thursday, May 1 with performances May 2 – 4. Students, seniors, military, and CMA members receive a $5 discount for all shows, except opening night.  For more information and reservations, call the Shadowbox Live Box Office at 614-416-7625 or go online at www.shadowboxlive.org.

Above: King Lake, California by Albert Bierstadt one of the more than 20 works from CMA’s collection used as inspiration for Shadowbox’s Gallery of Echoes.

6th Brandt Inspired Photo Hunt Challenge

The current round of CMA Photo Hunt assignments are inspired by our now on view Matthew Brandt: Sticky/Dusty/Wet, the first museum show for the hot Los Angeles based photographer. Brandt processes his photos using nontraditional materials such as bubble gum, honey bees, Pop rocks, and more, was recently named by Forbes the “Top 30 under 30 in art and design.”

BubblegumHere in an homage to a classic Ansel Adams shot, Brandt uses bubble gum in the processing. With that in mind, respond with your take on the sixth challenge:

  • Capture something that reflects  “Sticky” either in concept or process
  • Tag your work on Instagram with #CMAPhotoHunt and #Sticky
  • For this sixth assignment you have until Friday December 06, 2013.
  • Please note: images must be your own. Anyone in the world can participate.

Once again our William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography Catherine Evans will select her favorites (based on the most creative entries, and ones that best represent the assignment), and your creation could grace the walls at Columbus Museum of Art. The third CMA Photo Hunt exhibition was on display July-October in our Community Gallery, and featured work inspired by our COLOR exhibition in the Big Idea Gallery.

CMA Photo Hunts are a digital complement to CMA collections and exhibitions, give participants an opportunity to flex their creativity, be inspired by works or themes in Columbus Museum of Art exhibitions or collections, and respond to creative challenges with their own visual take. Since our Photo Hunts began we have received nearly 5,000 submissions from hundreds of photographers from Seattle to Ohio to Paris to Russia. With our first exhibition last fall, we were first museum in the world to present a curated, crowdsourced installation based on the popular photo sharing app Instagram.

Looking forward to seeing your visual response. Happy shooting!

Art Lab, Project Pivot, and Teens at CMA

ArtLab2013

If you happened to be in the museum on Wednesdays recently, you may have noticed the surplus of high-school-aged youth engaging in various activities. Project Pivot, the 4-year partnership with the Arts and College Preparatory Academy (artcollegeprep.org), is a high school program that experiments with formal and informal learning. Pivot and Art Lab meet every Wednesday. Pivot in the Studio and Ready Room and Art Lab in the Innovation Lab.

Art Lab, the out-of-school internship kicked off its first day recently with a photo shoot, gallery tour, sound booth intro, and zine workshop. More than 30 teens from four area high schools applied to the program and scheduled interviews with CMA staff. Only 15 were selected to participate, including Art Lab alumni who applied to come back for a second year.

From October until May, teen programming staff and mentors will be pushing teens to re-define what it means to be an artist, either as a profession or a way of existing curiously in the world. Members of the program will be encouraged to evaluate community need, and will be given resources to conceptualize events for museum visitors on our free Sundays.

In mid-November, Kansas City based artist, Sean Starowitz will be working with both Art Lab and Project Pivot on respective program initiatives. One of the reasons Sean was picked to work with our teens, is due to his belief that socially engaged art brings people together in unique ways, which create pathways for meaningful interactions, conversations, and experiences.  Art Lab’s first Social Sunday of the year will be a collaboration between Art Lab teens, CMA staff, Starowitz, and museum-goers alike. Stop in Sunday, November 17 from 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM to see what Art Lab teens have in store.

TeensatCMAThis Thursday November 14 will also be our first Drop-in Studio times for teens from 4:00 PM – 8:00 PM. Teens can hang out together and check out our Studio and Innovation Lab, mess around with Garageband, PhotoShop, a sound booth, and green screens, plus Studio time with art supplies, crafts, and a sewing machine. All are welcome, no registration requested.

Interested in serving on the Teen Event Council? The Teen Council meets monthly on the second Wednesday of each month from 4:30 PM -6:00 PM, rotating between COSI and the Columbus Museum of Art. Contact Morgan Anderson for details.

Art Speaks. Join the Conversation.

Morgan Anderson, Teen Programs Coordinator

5th Brandt Inspired Photo Hunt Challenge

Brandt Bees of Bees 2 2012 (detail 1)

The current round of CMA Photo Hunt assignments are inspired by our upcoming exhibition Matthew Brandt: Sticky/Dusty/Wet, which opens November 15, and is the first museum show for the hot Los Angeles based photographer. Brandt processes his photos using nontraditional materials such as bubble gum, honey bees, Pop rocks, and more, was recently named by Forbes the “Top 30 under 30 in art and design.”

Here Brandt embeds bees during the processing.With that in mind, respond with your take on the fifth challenge:

  • Capture something that reflects  “Embed” either in concept or process
  • Tag your work on Instagram with #CMAPhotoHunt and #Embed
  • For this fifth assignment you have until Friday November 22, 2013.
  • Please note: images must be your own. Anyone in the world can participate.

Once again our William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography Catherine Evans will select her favorites (based on the most creative entries, and ones that best represent the assignment), and your creation could grace the walls at Columbus Museum of Art. The third CMA Photo Hunt exhibition was on display July-October in our Community Gallery, and featured work inspired by our COLOR exhibition in the Big Idea Gallery.

CMA Photo Hunts are a digital complement to CMA collections and exhibitions, give participants an opportunity to flex their creativity, be inspired by works or themes in Columbus Museum of Art exhibitions or collections, and respond to creative challenges with their own visual take. Since our Photo Hunts began we have received more 4,000 submissions from hundreds of photographers from Seattle to Ohio to Paris to Russia. With our first exhibition last fall, we were first museum in the world to present a curated, crowdsourced installation based on the popular photo sharing app Instagram.

We’ll post the sixth and last in this series of Brandt-inspired Photo Hunt assignments here on our blog, and on Instagram on November 22.

Happy shooting!

(Bees of Bees 2, 2012 by Matthew Brandt, private collection).

Art and Ice Cream: Q&A with Jeni of Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams

Jeni Britton Bauer

Recently we caught up with Jeni Britton Bauer, James Beard award-winning cookbook author and founder of Columbus-based Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams to get her take on art, thinking like an artist, and her inspiration for creating an ice cream tribute to George Bellows.

Why does art matter to you?
Art answers the emotional Why? When I dig deep to find out, I gain new perspective. It’s time travel.  Why this? Why that? Why now? Why him?

What role does art play in your life?
It expands into the cracks and fills the gaps. Art helps me draw conclusions and make connections. When I think, I use all parts of my brain. It’s like when you work out, if you worked only one arm, you would have one big arm and one small one. Artistic thinking, which is not necessarily creative thinking, is a vital part of my thought process.

In ice cream I use art thinking when I decide what I’ll do with, say, a raspberry. Raspberries are a beautiful and perfect fruit in color, texture and flavor. There is nothing better than a raspberry and nothing you can add to a raspberry to make it more perfect. I can honor a raspberry by making a sorbet with as little else as possible. Just a bit of sugar. Pulverized. This is art because I have chosen to leave it almost in it’s original form. If I added tarragon to it, or mint, or even honey, which seem like fine things to do, I would have distracted the flavor. Because you can’t make a raspberry better or even more interesting. However, in a sorbet form, rather than a whole raspberry, the flavor is pink-red, and surprisingly grassy, a little tart and a bit sweet, a tiny bit biting and bitter. Things you may not even notice when chomping on a fresh berry.

Anything that a raspberry touches is given a kick in the pants. Think of a simple cake with raspberry sorbet melting into the crumb, or a rich chocolate cake. A scoop of dense raspberry sorbet plopped into a cup of Watershed gin with a sprig of lavender hanging off the rim (you smell it as you bring it to your nose), is the ice and the mixer in a fresh cocktail I call Rouge Your Knees. I can make fresh raspberries into a sauce and swirl it through a soft farmstead cheese ice cream. Raspberries become a tool in my ice cream arsenal to make softer flavors sing. I may use the sorbet to pop other flavors, but I’ll never add something other than a touch of sugar to the raspberries. They are perfect already.

Art answers why. Just because you put something together, should you? If you ask yourself this question about everything you do, art will play a big part of your life, too.

How are food and art alike?
They are both essential for survival.

What about George Bellows inspires you?
I am lucky to have seen the Bellows show at the National Gallery in Washington D.C and again at the Met in NYC. To see so many of his pieces here in his hometown is really wonderful. To see the paintings all together was life changing to me. I truly fell for George Bellows. I spent hours visiting the paintings. I jumped into them, especially the New York scenes. I love to compare his work to Winslow Homer, another of my favorite painters. I think that George Bellows’ work is edgier, it’s tougher, it’s bolder, and harder to take in, and that’s what makes it so strong for me. You can read his faces in his portraits. You can smell the air in his landscapes. You can feel the salt on your cheeks when you see the spray of the wave in his seascapes. And you begin to feel what his subjects felt. Some were suffering or struggling and the way he paints them you feel their struggles. Often the faces are smudges of many colors of paint, but they come through vividly, as if I know them personally. I also love the colors that are in each painting. If you look closely you will find may colors.

Bellows.ChurnAndBreak

Tell us about how you created the George Bellows flavor
My great grandparents had a big old house in Maine that I visited when I was 9 years old. It had secret passages behind walls, the kind where you pull the candlestick and the wall opens up. Those passages were hiding spots and escape routes on one of the last stops on the Underground Railroad. You could get all the way out to the back of the property through the wall of the living room. When you emerged, you would be in the middle of an old graveyard. Spooky. That summer I spent time frolicking in the cold New England waters. I ate salt water taffy, iced coffee and lobster for the first time. There is something about Maine that I got a glimpse of that summer that has stayed with me all these years, and that I revisit in Bellows’ paintings of the sea, especially the painting Churn and Break, which also has a name that sounds like an ice cream flavor. The sea churns, the ice cream churns.

It’s not just the sea that is salty, it’s the air. I wanted the ice cream to taste like salt water taffy. And we use salt from the sea, so the ice cream has that flavor. The cookies are colored to match specific parts of the waves. Inside you will find a fresh plum sauce. They are in season in Ohio, so it’s good timing, but it also adds the deep purple color of the rocks in the painting. I also think that plums have a salty scent to them. That’s hard to imagine, but it’s true. Even plum blossoms smell salty to me. So Sea Salt and Plum Jam was my tribute to George Bellows’ painting Churn and Break.

BellowsIceCream700

How does the Columbus community incubate creativity?
I make a distinction between art and creativity. Creativity has very little to do with art. You can be an artist and not be an especially creative thinker (as my raspberry example above). But, I’m not convinced that you can be a scientist without being a creative thinker. So let’s all agree that creativity is very important. It’s important for artists, scientists, mathletes, farmers, chefs, and moms and dads. If you can’t think creatively then you rob yourself and your community of the ability to change the world.

When you encounter a brick wall, you may turn around. I see potential in a brick wall, I see opportunity. Sometimes I can get over it, sometimes I can knock it down. And I get to reap the benefits of what’s on the other side. Creativity is seeing potential and opportunity where others don’t.

So how do we nurture this in Columbus? We are lucky to have such incredible art museums, fountains, parks, devoted musicians, and playthings. We are lucky to have artists living here and to have entire districts devoted to art. But let’s do better because it’s important. Kids used to learn to draw in school. Really draw. Now we don’t. Drawing is important because it can help you explain things to people. It can help you work through a problem. I think everyone should learn to draw. It’s like I said above, if you only learned math and science then it’s like a body builder who only works out one arm and one leg. We have to do a better job nurturing whole brain thinkers. That has to start in kindergarten and before. Art incubates creative thinking because it forces you to move emotions and thoughts through your body and finger tips and transpose them onto paper, canvas, or other mediums.

Who are some of your favorite artists?
Frank Stella, George Bellows, Matisse, Picasso, Gauguin, Wayne Thiebaud, Richard Diebenkorn, and my daughter Greta.

George Bellows and the American Experience will remain on view at CMA through January 4, 2014. Jeni’s Sea Salt and Plum Jam Bellows-inspired ice cream will be served exclusively at our annual Art Celebration and ArtFUSION on October 19, 2013.

Free Admission for Smithsonian’s 9th Annual Museum Day Live

MuseumEntrance

The Columbus Museum of Art will offer free admission on Saturday September 28, 2013, as part of Smithsonian magazine’s ninth annual Museum Day Live! A nationwide event, Museum Day Live! offers free admission to visitors presenting a Museum Day Live! ticket at a participating museum or cultural institution.

Inclusive by design, the event represents Smithsonian’s commitment to make learning and the spread of knowledge accessible to everyone, giving museums across all 50 states the opportunity to emulate the admission policy of the Smithsonian museums in Washington, D.C. Last year’s event drew over 400,000 participants, and this year’s event expects record-high participation.

Admission includes CMA’s George Bellows and the American Experience exhibition. George Bellows is widely considered to be one of the finest artists America has ever produced. Bellows left Columbus, Ohio in 1904 to study art in New York City, and within five years the young artist had taken the American art world by storm, winning every major award all the while insisting upon a new, and often unsettling, standard for the subject matter deemed acceptable as fine art. This exhibition, which includes more than 35 paintings as well as major drawings and prints, reveals the virtuosic ability and amazing breath of this master painter. And don’t forget to see COLOR, a lively, hands-on exhibition in CMA’s Big Idea Gallery.

The Museum Day Live! ticket is available to download at Smithsonian.com/museumday. Visitors who present the Museum Day Live! ticket will gain free entrance for two at participating venues for one day only. One ticket is permitted per household, per email address. For more information about Museum Day Live! 2013 and a list of participating museums and cultural institutions, please visit Smithsonian.com/museumday.

Please note: you can also present your Museum Day Live! ticket on the screen of your smartphone.

Parking is available for free in our lot off Gay Street. Please use the new entrance off the West Garden on 9th Street.

Be sure to tag your visit with @columbusmuseum and #museumdaylive on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.

How We Make Art in the CMA Center for Creativity

Summer Art Workshops 2013

As we head full steam ahead into the school year, I am taking some time to reflect on Summer Art Workshops (SAW), why they are awesome, and how we can infuse the same energy into our school year programs, such as our Studio Thinking workshops or Home School workshops.

As the Manager for Studio Initiatives here at CMA, I may be just a bit biased, but I sincerely believe that these workshops are really special. This is no accident.  We’ve been working for years to hone our vision around art-making here at CMA, and Summer Art Workshops exemplify a lot of the philosophies we hold dear.  So, here’s the quickie list of how we make art in the CMA Center for Creativity.

1.    Ideas come first.  These workshops aren’t about painting, building, or sewing. They are about creative thinking, imagination, play, risk-taking, and all that good stuff. However, learning new skills becomes necessary to turn creative ideas into reality. This means increased relevance and sense of purpose for everyone.
2.    Students and instructors as co-learners and artist collaborators. While ideal instructors are practicing artists, adept at a variety of media, expecting them to be an expert in everything is ridiculous. The best instructors are not afraid to take risks and learn with the students.
3.    Workshops allow for surprises and oddities. Our student artists have wonderful, weird ideas.  We try to structure our workshops in a manner to allow those ideas to unfold naturally, which can result in some hilarious results if we allow it (and we do).
4.    The world is our museum. Not only do we use the CMA galleries to provoke imagination and storytelling, but our workshops are inspired by the art of the everyday. From high fashion to haunted houses, anything can be fodder for creative exploration.
5.    The Center for Creativity is an excellent resource. Not only do we get a sunny Studio with a bright green floor and bunch of fun toys (spray booth, exposure unit, etc), we also have the Innovation Lab, our tech studio, with adjustable lighting, a projection screen and tons of useful technology (green screen, laptops). Having these resources means high quality programming.

Now that SAW is over (phew!), we’re gearing up for Doodles, Day of Play, Girl Scout Day, and a gazillion other programs involving art-making.  Whether the program is for families, scouts, homeschoolers, or a school field trip, we will try to construct each experience as playful co-creators, encouraging our student artists to experiment and think, just like real artists!

Art Speaks. Join the Conversation.

Susie Underwood, Manager for Studio Initiatives

2nd Mobile Photography Exhibition Now on View

CMA Photo Hunt 2nd Exhibition

CMA continues to support the growing mobile photography community with our second CMA Photo Hunt exhibition. Last fall, CMA was the first museum in the world to present an exhibition of curated, crowdsourced photos shared using the popular photo app Instagram. Our Radical Camera exhibition served as inspiration.This time around CMA gave photographers assignments based on our Making Faces exhibition, which explores portraiture from our permanent collection. Our William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography Catherine Evans selected her favorite images and her top picks are now on view in the Community Gallery at CMA’s Center for Creativity.

Work from more than 30 mobile photographers is represented including everyone from an Instagrammer from Seattle, a former CMA Art Lab teen,  a father and daughter duo from Columbus, a math and science teacher from Toledo, an art student from Paris, a Columbus cop, commercial photographers, designers, artists, and more. The second CMA Photo Hunt exhibition will remain on view through the summer.

Read more about the inception of the Photo Hunt project in stories in The Columbus Dispatch, Art Daily, and Clic France, and Columbus Alive, and view the NBC4 story. To see a collection of all the more than 3,000 images that have been submitted since the inception of our Photo Hunts, view the CMA Photo Hunt Online Gallery.

Check the CMA blog and follow us on Instagram (columbusmuseum) for more information about new CMA Photo Hunts, and your opportunity to be selected for our next CMA Photo Hunt installation.

Questions on participating in the CMA Photo Hunts? Contact CMA Digital Communications Manager Jennifer Poleon.

Mother’s Day Brunch at Columbus Museum of Art

 at Columbus Museum of Art

Treat your mom to a relaxing and inspiring day of art, food, and memories at one of the most lovely spots in Columbus during our Mother’s Day Brunch on May 12, 2013. See our Rothko exhibition (before it closes May 26, 2013) and our Czech Puppets exhibition, and dine on stuffed French toast, smoked salmon, quiche, pork loin and more from Barcelona’s Sidecar Catering. Adults: $30 members, $35 nonmembers; Kids 12 and under, $12 members, $15 nonmembers. Reservations for Mother’s Day Brunch available from 11 AM – 2:00 PM. Reserve your time now by calling 614-629-0359.

Mother’s Day Menu:
Crepe Station, Stuffed Brioche French Toast — with maple syrup, whipped cream, blueberries, and powdered sugar, Assorted Muffins, Danish, and mini Bagels with cream cheese, whipped butter, and jelly, Fresh Fruit and Cheese Display, Smoked Salmon Display, Mini Quiche — Western, Broccoli and Cheddar, and Cheese Bacon, Mixed Greens Salad, Orzo Pasta Salad, Stella Pasta (vegetarian), Roasted Herb Chicken, Tilapia, Sidecar Pork Loin with cream Savoy cabbage, Prime Rib Carving Station with Horseradish Cream, Herbed Mayonnaise, and Silver Dollar Buns, Roasted Red Skin Potatoes, Spring Vegetable Medley, O’Brian Potatoes. Specially for Kids: Mac & Cheese, and Chicken Fingers.

(Photo by Phil Chester).

PLEASE NOTE: Our Mother’s Day Brunch is now SOLD OUT.