Exhibitions

Shine On: Nurses in Art
March 20, 2015 - June 21, 2015

Brooks.LaFranceCroisee
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Through sculpture, paintings, textiles, prints, photographs, and posters that span centuries, Shine On celebrates the invaluable contribution that nurses have made to society. The innate capacity of humans to care for one another is fundamental to the practice of nursing and has been demonstrated in art that dates from ancient civilizations the world over. Equally integral to nursing is the much more recent notion that Florence Nightingale called “hard preparation.” That is the practical training, experience, and technical knowledge that is required of nursing professionals in response to the complexity of the human body and efforts to keep it well from birth through the aging process. Shine On brings together images of humans caring for one another, the professionalization of nursing that began in the nineteenth century, and the continuing vital and complex role that nurses play in our world today. Artists featured in the exhibition include Rembrandt van Rijn, Mary Cassatt, George Bellows, Romaine Brooks, Alfred Eisenstaedt, and Robert Vickrey. Visitors to the exhibition can also view an array of film clips demonstrating the portrayal of nurses in popular culture.

Fabric of Survival: The Art of Esther Nisenthal Krinitz
April 3, 2015 - June 14, 2015

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At first glance, the colorful needlework collages in Fabric of Survival: The Art of Esther Nisenthal Krinitz seem to depict bucolic scenes of the Polish countryside. On closer examination, they tell a horrific tale of survival. Esther (1927-2001) and her younger sister Mania were the only members of their family, and among the few Jews in their Polish village, to survive the Holocaust. At the age of fifteen, Esther refused the Nazi order for the town’s Jews to report to a nearby railroad station for relocation. She and her sister separated from the family and never saw them again. In 1977, at the age of fifty, Esther began creating works of fabric art to depict her stories of survival. Over a twenty-year period, she created a collection of thirty-six needlework pictures that tell her remarkable story exquisitely and in great detail.

Although she had no artistic training, Esther began sewing at a young age. The needlework pictures demonstrate her outstanding, technical skills and ability to create texture and dimensionality from a combination of complex stitches and imaginative design. At once beautiful and shocking, the story embedded in the layers of fabric compels us to understand the roles of victim, perpetrator, and bystander during this bleak chapter of history and reminds us of the continuing need to fight injustice and bigotry. In addition, Esther’s tapestries demonstrate the importance of needlework and fabric art as an important category of artistic expression that historically has been undervalued as “women’s work.” The exhibition has been scheduled to coincide with Yom Hashoah, the national Holocaust Day of Remembrance on April 15. The award-winning 30-minute documentary film, Through the Eye of the Needle, which presents Esther’s story in her own words, accompanies the exhibition.

Supported by Ohio Humanities Council, a state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, Columbus Jewish Foundation, and Puffin Foundation West.
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Hats on the Silk Road: Selections from the Collection of Russell S. and Dona Fling
April 17, 2015 - July 5, 2015

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The Columbus Museum of Art invites you to explore the culture and history of Southern Asia’s Silk Road. Hats on the Silk Road: Selections from the Collection of Russell S. and Dona Fling, on view April 17 – July 5, showcases the remarkable collection of Russell S. and Dona Fling, among the most important collections of its kind in the world.

The Silk Road is not a physical highway but consists of thousands of miles of random, unpaved, trading trails stretching across Southern Asia. Throughout history, traders traveling these trails searching for new markets encountered a variety of cultures and religions along the way, and, as commodities were traded, so were the influences of these other ways of life.

The exhibition presents a colorful selection of headdresses, hats and, skullcaps from the Fling Collection and examines the history, provenance and, cultural backgrounds from which the works come.  These hats reflect the people who made them, as well as their cultures, religions, customs, traditions, livelihoods, social status, time periods, and even the climate. Hats were made for practical purposes, such as protection from the weather; for special occasions, such as weddings; for recognizing social or political status; and for purposes of religion. They represent all levels of society, from rulers to ordinary citizens, rich and poor, male and female, adult and child. Some were worn by kings, queens, and powerful political leaders; others, by brides and grooms.

The Fling Collection is extensive, including hats from across the globe and including countries and regions such as Turkey, Syria, Iran, Yemen, Azerbaijan, Central Asia, Russia, Mongolia, Nagaland, India, Pakistan, Tibet, Bhutan, Southeast Asia, and the Philippines — many of them in the current world spotlight.