Tag: photography

CMA Photo Hunt Assignment 6: Contrast

Henri Cartier Bresson

For the sixth CMA Photo Hunt assignment here is your challenge:

  • Capture something that reflects the word “Contrast.”
  • Tag your work on Twitter, Flickr or Instagram with #CMAPhotoHunt and #Contrast plus your #city.
  • For this next assignment you have until Tuesday July 24, 2012.

The Andalusia image above is from our collection and is by great French photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson. Bresson perfected his idea of the “decisive moment,” his characterization of the style that became his trademark. “Above all,” he once said, “I craved to seize the whole essence, in the confines of a single photograph, of some situation that was in the process of unfolding itself before my eyes.” So for this Contrast assignment, we also challenge you to use Bresson as your guide.

Catherine Evans, our William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography, will select a few of her favorites, and your creation could grace the walls at Columbus Museum of Art come this fall.

In the fifth Columbus Museum of Art Photo Hunt assignment we challenged you to capture something that reflects the word “Pride.” (You have until midnight tonight to submit Pride photos). See how people captured and interpreted the first several assignments in the CMA Photo Hunt Gallery.

CMA Photo Hunts are inspired by our The Radical Camera show and the Photo Leaguers, who challenged themselves with assignments that captured a word or phrase. Through the run of The Radical Camera we’ll be posting new photo assignment challenges. Anyone around the world can participate. Photos you have already taken that fit each assignment, are also encouraged.

See the Curator’s Choice post for Catherine’s favorite photos from the first few assignments. And happy shooting!

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Curator’s Choice: CMA Photo Hunts Round 1

As promised Catherine Evans, William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography, has selected some of her favorite CMA Photo Hunt submissions out of the hundreds of great entries tagged so far. See what she chose from the Sign of the Times, Resourcefulness and Joy assignments, and what she has to say about why they work so well.

Sign of the Times Assignment

In this photo from Nick Carron (@urbancurse), verticals and horizontals are in harmony and intention with one another. It has an industrial feel, but has this human touch with the handwritten instructions.

 

This is an elegant reference to our current housing problem with a good use of filters to underscore a distressed situation. Nice work by @_Thisspace_.

 

A big and bold sign with a provocative imperative challenge in this shot from Tim Courlas  (@durtball).

 

Resourcefulness Assignment

This was a tougher assignment, however this picture by @mamawooste clearly embraces the resourcefulness theme. It’s an interesting use of recycling and meta-messaging all in one.

 

Joy

The light lands perfectly on the baby, and makes her the surprising center of this photograph from @uponadaydreamer.

 

Energy, movement and water come together in this dynamically cropped shot from Nick Carron (@urbancurse). The empty space in between is an effective compositional strategy.

 

Even without an actual human being, this is the perfect icon of summer joy in this picture from @LittleMissLibrarian.

 

Looking forward to seeing what you submit, and choosing favorites from the next several assignments. Great work from everyone who has tagged their photos so far!

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Catherine Evans, CMA’s William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography

 

 

 

CMA Photo Hunt Assignment 5: Pride

For the fifth CMA Photo Hunt assignment here is your challenge:

  • Capture something that reflects the word “Pride.”
  • Tag your work on Twitter, Flickr or Instagram with #CMAPhotoHunt and #Pride plus your #city.
  • For this next assignment you have until Friday July 13, 2012.

We expect there will be a lot of fireworks submissions, but we challenge you to capture those small moments of pride, as well.

Catherine Evans, our William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography, will select a few of her favorites, and your creation could grace the walls at Columbus Museum of Art come this fall.

In the fourth Columbus Museum of Art Photo Hunt assignment we challenged you to capture something that reflects the word “Community.” (You have until midnight tonight to submit Community photos). See how people captured and interpreted the first several assignments in the CMA Photo Hunt Gallery.

CMA Photo Hunts are inspired by our The Radical Camera show and the Photo Leaguers, who challenged themselves with assignments that captured a word or phrase. Through the run of The Radical Camera we’ll be posting new photo assignment challenges. Anyone around the world can participate. Photos you have already taken that fit each assignment, are also encouraged.

Catherine has selected some of her favorite photos from the first few assignments. Look for a blog post soon with her choices, and and why they work so well.

Have a great Fourth of July, Doo Dah, Canada Day etc. Happy shooting!

Art Speaks. Join the Conversation.

CMA Photo Hunt Assignment 4: Community

In the third Columbus Museum of Art Photo Hunt assignment we challenged you to capture something that reflects the word “Joy.” (You have until midnight tonight to submit Joy photos). See how people captured and interpreted the first few assignments in the CMA Photo Hunt Gallery.

CMA Photo Hunts are inspired by our The Radical Camera show and the Photo Leaguers, who challenged themselves to capture a word or phrase, and then they’d have a big party to critique and celebrate. Through the run of The Radical Camera we’ll be posting new photo assignment challenges. Anyone around the world can participate.

For the fourth CMA Photo Hunt assignment here is your challenge:

  • Capture something that reflects the word “Community.” How you capture it is up to you.
  • Tag your work on Twitter, Flickr or Instagram with #CMAPhotoHunt and #Community plus your #city.
  • For this next assignment you have until Friday June 29, 2012.

Catherine Evans, our William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography, will select a few of her favorites, and your creation could grace the walls at Columbus Museum of Art come this fall.

Most of you are submitting through Instagram. We encourage you to follow your fellow modern day Photo Leaguers, and comment on work that impresses you or moves you.

Look for a blog post in the next week or so from Catherine, who will be blogging about some of her favorite photos from the first three assignments, and why they work so well.

Keep up the good work!

Art Speaks. Join the Conversation.

CMA Photo Hunt Gallery

Originally inspired by our critically acclaimed The Radical Camera show and the Photo League, our CMA Photo Hunt assignments are an opportunity to flex your creative muscle. Since our Photo Hunts began we have received thousands of submissions from hundreds of mobile photographers from Seattle to Ohio to Paris to Russia. With our first exhibition in fall of 2012, we were first museum in the world to present a curated, crowdsourced installation based on the popular photo sharing app Instagram. Read more on the fourth CMA Photo Hunt exhibition inspired by Matthew Brandt, sticky/dusty/wet, the first solo museum show from the hot LA photographer. And be sure to watch for new assignments soon on the CMA blog and Instagram. Anyone in the world can participate.

Read more about the inception of the Photo Hunt project in stories in The Columbus Dispatch, Art Daily, and Clic France, and Columbus Alive.

Take a look at the many creative entries since CMA Photo Hunts began.

#CMAPhotoHunt via Instagram

#CMAPhotoHunt via Twitter

#CMAPhotoHunt via Flickr

Currently there are no photos in this stream.

12 for 12: Abdi Roble

In the next of our 12 for 12 series in celebration of the Columbus Bicentennial, we feature Columbus photographer Abdi Roble.

Abdi Roble was born in Mogadishu, Somalia in 1964 and immigrated to the United States in 1989, first to Washington, DC and a year later to Columbus, Ohio. Self-taught in photography, Roble has been engaged for many years in the Somali Documentary Project, an ambitious mission he founded to create a visual archive of Somali populations outside of their native country. He has traveled to Dadaab, Kenya, to photograph life in the refugee camps, capturing the ethos of the diaspora from an intimate perspective. Working under unpredictable conditions, with available light and a hand-held camera, Roble has been building a photographic record of and for a globally dispersed people.

Roble has had several exhibitions in Columbus including shows at the MPX Gallery the Ohio Art Council’s Riffe Gallery. His one-person presentation at the Columbus Museum of Art in 2007, entitled Stories of the Somali Diaspora, also traveled to the Bates College Museum of Art in Lewiston, Maine; the Weisman Art Museum of the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, Minnesota; and the Plains Art Museum in Fargo, North Dakota. All of the venues for Stories of the Somali Diaspora have significant Somali populations. In 2008, The Somali Diaspora: A Journey Away by Roble and Doug Rutledge was published by the University of Minnesota Press.

(Photo by Abdi Roble, First Day of School Portland Maine. From Columbus Museum of Art permanent collection).

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Join the Hunt: CMA Photo Hunts

Become a modern-day Photo Leaguer by participating in Columbus Museum of Art Photo Hunts. Every few weeks through early September and the run of our critically acclaimed The Radical Camera, we’ll be sending you out with new photo assignments, and an opportunity to flex your creative muscle. Anyone in the world can participate.

Our CMA Photo Hunt assignments are inspired by the Photo League, a group of young photographers from the 1930s-1950s who took to the streets with their cameras just as photography was becoming recognized as an art, and magazines such as Life and Look were forming. Artists in the Photo League were known for capturing sharply revealing, compelling moments from everyday life. Photo Hunts were their way of giving themselves creative challenges, and having fun. During Photo Hunts, Photo Leaguers were sent out to capture a word or phrase, then their work was developed, and they’d have a big party to critique and celebrate.

For the first Photo Hunt assignment here is your challenge:

  • Capture something that reflects the phrase “Sign of the Times.” How you capture it is up to you.
  • Tag your work on Twitter, Flickr or Instagram with #CMAPhotoHunt and #signofthetimes, plus your #city.
  • For the first assignment you have two weeks (until Friday June 1, 2012). After that we’ll be announcing new assignments biweekly.

Along the way we’ll be highlighting some of our favorite CMA Photo Hunt submissions via our blog and social media. Catherine Evans, our William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography, will select a few of her favorites, and your work might be hanging on the walls at Columbus Museum of Art come this fall.

If you need some inspiration, be sure to check out our The Radical Camera exhibition. Questions about the CMA Photo Hunts? Let us know in the comments. Happy shooting!

(Above photo: Times Square from the Astor Hotel by Photo Leaguer Ruth Orkin).

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The Radical Camera Opens in Columbus

Find out more about our major exhibition, The Radical Camera: New York’s Photo League, 1936 – 1951, which opens this Thursday April 19, 2012 in Columbus. We co-organized the exhibition with The Jewish Museum, where it premiered this fall to rave reviews. The New York Times calls The Radical Camera “a stirring show.”

Guided by a belief in the transformative power of photography, the Photo League took to the streets in the 1930s and 1940s to record the effects of poverty, war, racial inequality, and social injustice. Artists in the Photo League were known for capturing sharply revealing, compelling moments from everyday life.  Their focus centered on New York City and its vibrant streets – a shoeshine boy, a brass band on a bustling corner, a crowded beach at Coney Island.  Many of the images are beautiful, yet harbor strong social commentary on issues of class, race, and opportunity.  The Radical Camera exhibition explores the fascinating blend of aesthetics and social activism at the heart of the Photo League.

The innovative contributions of the Photo League during its 15-year existence (1936–1951) were significant. As it grew, the League would mirror monumental shifts in the world starting with the Depression, through World War II and ending with the Red Scare. Born of the worker’s movement, the Photo League was an organization of young, idealistic photographers who believed in documentary photography as an expressive medium and powerful tool for exposing social problems. It was also a school with teachers such as Sid Grossman, who encouraged students to take their cameras to the streets and discover the meaning of their work as well as their relationship to it.  The League had a darkroom for printing, published an acclaimed newsletter called Photo Notes, offered exhibition space, and was a place to socialize, especially among first-generation Jewish-Americans.

The first museum exhibition in three decades to comprehensively look at the Photo League, The Radical Camera reveals that the League encouraged a surprisingly broad spectrum of work throughout extraordinarily turbulent times.  The organization’s members included some of the most noted photographers of the mid-20th century—W. Eugene Smith, Weegee, Lisette Model, Berenice Abbott and Aaron Siskind, to name a few.  The Photo League helped validate photography as a fine art, presenting student work and guest exhibitions by established photographers such as Eugène Atget, Henri Cartier-Bresson, and Edward Weston, among others.

These affecting black and white photographs show life as it was lived mostly on the streets, sidewalks and subways of New York. Joy, playfulness, and caprice as well as poverty and hardship are in evidence.  In addition to their urban focus, Leaguers photographed in rural America, and during World War II, in Latin America and Europe.  The exhibition also addresses the active participation of women who found rare access and recognition at the League. The Radical Camera presents the League within a critical, historical context. Developments in photojournalism were catalyzing a new information era in which photo essays were appearing for the first time in magazines such as Life and Look.

As time went on, its social documentary roots evolved toward a more experimental approach, laying the foundation for the next generation of street photographers. One of the principal themes of the exhibition is how the League fostered a multifaceted and changing identity of documentary photography, and a move toward a more subjective, poetic reading of life.

In 1947, the League came under the pall of McCarthyism and was blacklisted for its alleged involvement with the Communist Party.  Ironically, the Photo League had just begun a national campaign to broaden its base as a “Center for American Photography.”  Despite the support of Ansel Adams, Beaumont and Nancy Newhall, Paul Strand and many other national figures, this vision of a national photography center could not overcome the Red Scare. As paranoia and fear spread, the Photo League was forced to disband in 1951. As ARTnews said in their review, “This long-overdue and well-deserved survey demonstrates the extent to which the Photo League influenced our understanding of documentary photography.”

The exhibition was organized by Catherine Evans, William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography, Columbus Museum of Art and Mason Klein, Curator of Fine Arts, The Jewish Museum.

Following its CMA presentation, The Radical Camera exhibition will travel to the Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco, CA (November 15, 2012 – February 24, 2013); and Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach, FL (March 16 – June 16, 2013).

Photo: Autorama Top Hats, by Dan Weiner, 1950s, © Estate of Dan Weiner, Columbus Museum of Art, Ohio-Museum Purchase with funds provided by Elizabeth M. Ross, the Derby Fund, John S. and Catherine Chapin Kobacker, and the Friends of the Photo League.

Teens, Photography, & Columbus

Utilizing the power of photography to engage teens in socially relevant conversations, the Columbus Museum of Art’s Columbus In Focus program invites students from two Columbus City high schools, Linden McKinley and Marion Franklin, to examine the rich history of Columbus and document it during the Columbus Bicentennial. With these photographs, students invite you into their world as they uncover their communities past, confront today’s most pressing issues, and explore their place in their city and the world at large.

This years participants also looked to extend their reach into the community. Three students from Linden McKinley helped create QR Code plaques that are installed in locations thoughout Columbus. These plaques direct viewers to their exhibition at CMA and online resources located on this page.

To see more student work please visit the Columbus In Focus Flickr Group or check out the Columbus Underground story on the Columbus In Focus program.

The work the In Focus students created is on view at CMA May 3 – September 8, 2012. Columbus In Focus will also dovetail with CMA’s Radical Camera exhibition, which highlights the work of the Photo League, the pioneering documentary photography movement of the 1930s and 1940s. For more information about the Columbus In Focus teen photography program please contact Kristin Lantz at kristin.lantz@cmaohio.org.

The Focus program is generously supported by the National Endowment for the Arts and Puffin Foundation West, Ltd.

 

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Kristin Lantz, School Programs Coordinator

CMA Celebrates Columbus

For the Columbus Bicentennial, Columbus Museum of Art is asking the community to join 200Columbus and the Columbus Bicentennial celebration by creating your own photograph, painting, sculpture, poem, drawing, or other work inspired by the people or places in our community. Is there a landmark that signifies Columbus for you? A Columbus neighborhood that holds fond memories? An out of the way place you’d like others to discover? Has there been someone in the community who has inspired you? A moment that crystalizes what Columbus means to you?

Create your own artistic interpretation of who and what Columbus is as a city then upload a photograph of the work to our
CMA Celebrates Columbus group
on Flickr. Throughout the year, the Museum will be highlight submissions through blogs, social media channels and events to show what a vibrant, creative place Columbus is to live and work. Join the CMA Celebrates Columbus Flickr group and upload images of your work inspired by Columbus. Add any appropriate tags that might identify your work.

Need some inspiration? Check out CMA’s Columbus Views exhibition on view through May 27, 2012.

We’re looking forward to seeing your creative masterpieces.

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Jennifer Poleon, Digital Communications Manager