Jennifer Poleon

About Jennifer Poleon

Jennifer Poleon is the Digital Communications Manager for Columbus Museum of Art, and the organizer for CMA's groundbreaking #MobilePhotoNow mobile photography exhibition.

Helping Kids and Schools Get Creative and Connect During a Pandemic with the Homemade Masterpiece Challenge

Homemade Masterpiece Challenge: recreating Wiley

The year 2020 presented a few challenges early on, but by the end of February, things at Our Lady of Perpetual Help School were on the up and up, chugging away as usual.

And then… everything changed.

Just like that, we found ourselves scrambling to transition, in a 48-hour period, to online distance learning. This transition did not come without bumps, trials and errors, and then a few more bumps, but we figured it out. As a teacher, I was nervous. As an art teacher, specifically, I was also sad. Art is a hands-on learning experience. I love witnessing the artistic process from start to finish. I love teaching a wide range of art materials. I had no idea what my kids had access to at home or if they would even be able to find access to things they didn’t have. How could I make the online art room work?

When I first discovered Columbus Museum of Art’s Homemade Masterpiece challenge on social media, I thought it looked like such a fun challenge! The recreations I had seen were fantastic and some were hysterical! It’s amazing to see how creative people can be! I began to think about the challenge from an art educators standpoint. This challenge is not just a way to recreate a masterpiece, it could also be kind of a sneaky way to get kids to really look closely at a piece of art. They would have to look at a variety of art to select what they wanted to recreate and look closely at all of the details of a single piece in order to find props and create costumes. They would need to notice the lighting of the piece and how many people or animals they would need to recruit to be the characters in their recreation. In some cases, they would even need to interpret what the artist was trying to portray and come up with a creative solution for recreating it. I could also link the challenge to the art of cosplay, which some students might already be familiar with. This museum challenge would be a perfect at home project for my students!

I, first, assigned the project to eighth grade and third grade. The results started coming in and they were so incredible, I knew I had to include the rest of my students in on the fun! The project ended up being more than just a fun project. Many students worked together with their families to accomplish their recreations. I had so many parents email me with their student’s artwork and express how much fun they had working together. The past few months have been so stressful for everyone and the art projects were an opportunity for the students and families to cut loose, at least for a little while, and work on something fun and creative.

Once all of the kids (and some teachers,too) had completed the assignment, I knew I wanted to share the images with the families. I had been compiling a slideshow of all of the images along the way and, aside from one or two other people, I was the only one that had seen all of them. They were SO good! I planned a “digital gallery opening” and created a video. On a whim, I asked the Columbus Museum of Art if they would be willing to contribute a short clip, to which they graciously obliged! And here we are!

While this spring has been a little crazy, I feel so lucky to be in a school that is very supportive of the arts! It is such an awesome opportunity to share my love of art with kids and see their faces light up when they create their own masterpieces.

Check out the highlights from the Virtual Gallery Opening.

 

-Emily Davis is the kindergarten through eighth grade art teacher at Our Lady of Perpetual Help in Grove City, Ohio. When she is not teaching or making art, she can be found chasing around her very active (and very quick) three year old.

Check out more creative responses to the Homemade Masterpiece challenge.

Homemade Masterpiece Favorites

Now more than ever creativity matters. Creativity comforts. Creativity connects. Creativity inspires us to see the world in new ways, and celebrates the best in us. We’ve been working tirelessly to bring you creative opportunities at home. Thousands of people responded to our online challenge to recreate art and found joy in creating their own #HomemadeMasterpiece.

See below for some of our favorite recreations.

– Jennifer Poleon is Digital Communications Manager for Columbus Museum of Art, and the organizer for CMA’s groundbreaking #MobilePhotoNow mobile photography exhibition.

A Day of Silence and Coming Out

We asked staff members to contribute to our Collective Voices audio guides as part of the exhibition Art after Stonewall,1969-1889, the groundbreaking survey featuring more than 200 works of art and related visual materials that explore the profound impact of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBTQ) Civil-Rights movement on the art world.

Listen to a few of their personal stories in honor of A Day of Silence today, a national student led day protesting the silencing and erasure of LGBTQ people. 

The Pizzuti Collection of the Columbus Museum of Art’s Experience and Operations Manager, Mark Zuzik, reflects on the importance of LGBT representation, and his hopes for the future. 
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Press 295#

Rorke Mair, a Floor Supervisor at CMA, shares an intimate and personal story about coming out. 
Call 614.448.5095
Press 296#

From Art after Stonewall

Installation view from the Coming Out section of Art after Stonewall, 1969-1989.

“Coming Out,” is a key message and through-line in the Art after Stonewall exhibition, as Daniel Marcus, Columbus Museum of Art’s Roy Lichtenstein Curatorial Fellow explores more here.

A Day of Silence and Coming Out

We asked staff members to contribute to our Collective Voices audio guides as part of the exhibition Art after Stonewall,1969-1889, the groundbreaking survey featuring more than 200 works of art and related visual materials that explore the profound impact of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBTQ) Civil-Rights movement on the art world.

Listen to a few of their personal stories in honor of A Day of Silence today, a national student led day protesting the silencing and erasure of LGBTQ people. 

The Pizzuti Collection of the Columbus Museum of Art’s Experience and Operations Manager, Mark Zuzik, reflects on the importance of LGBT representation, and his hopes for the future. 
Call 614.448.5095
Press 295#

Rorke Mair, a Floor Supervisor at CMA, shares an intimate and personal story about coming out. 
Call 614.448.5095
Press 296#

From Art after Stonewall

Installation view from the Coming Out section of Art after Stonewall, 1969-1989.

“Coming Out,” is a key message and through-line in the Art after Stonewall exhibition, as Daniel Marcus, Columbus Museum of Art’s Roy Lichtenstein Curatorial Fellow explores more here.

Zoom Backgrounds from Columbus Museum of Art

Conduct your next Zoom meeting from inside a Monet painting. Add some artistic flair to your Zoom meetings and happy hours with these free downloadable Zoom backgrounds from Columbus Museum of Art’s permanent collection. Choose from Zoom backgrounds featuring Monet’s View of Bennecourt and George Bellows’ Polo at Lakewood, and more.

Not sure how to change your Zoom background? Check out these tips from Refinery29. 

 

– Jennifer Poleon is Digital Communications Manager for Columbus Museum of Art, and the organizer for CMA’s groundbreaking #MobilePhotoNow mobile photography exhibition.

Recreate Famous Art: Homemade Masterpiece Challenge

Recreate Famous Art: Degas ballerina

 

Art museums may be closed right now due to the coronavirus, but there are still ways to engage with art.

We could all use a bit of light right now. So while you are homebound, inspired by the Getty, we challenge you to recreate famous art from museums using just yourself, your loved ones, pets and/or objects from your home.

Here are some loose guidelines for recreating your art masterpiece:

  • Choose your favorite artwork
  • Find three things lying around your house
  • Recreate the artwork with those items
  • Take a picture and share on social media using hashtags #HomemadeMasterpiece and #betweenartandquarantine.

Feel free to adapt this challenge as you see fit.

Get inspiration for artwork from Columbus Museum of Art’s online collection featuring everything from Impressionist masterworks to modern American masterpieces and more.

You can also check out some of the creative ideas from people who responded to the Getty’s art challenge.

In addition to Columbus Museum of Art’s online art collection, check out online art from museums such as The Met, Art Institute of Chicago, Cleveland Museum of Art, Detroit Institute of Art, and many more.

We can’t wait to see what creative art recreations everyone comes up with!

The CMA staff took the challenge this week to give you ideas to get you started. Check out some of their recreations below. As you can see from the first example, we think maybe our Development Operations Coordinator may have a budding pet model on her hands.

– Jennifer Poleon is the Digital Communications Manager for Columbus Museum of Art, and the organizer for CMA’s groundbreaking #MobilePhotoNow mobile photography exhibition.