Picture Books  #MyCMAStudio Challenge

I love picture books even though I haven’t been a kid in a long time. What I love most are all the different ways that artists use materials to create pictures that help tell a story. Some artists create illustrations using paint, pastel chalks, ink, markers, paper and even fabrics. When children are too young to read they will often look at the pictures or illustrations in a book to tell the story. The pictures usually include images that hint at what the words are on the page. 

The picture I created is a memory from my childhood of summers spent at my grandmothers, playing outdoors and having lots of fun. How can you tell the season in my picture? How are the children dressed? What do the colors tell you? My picture was created with construction paper, bits of paper towel for the clothing and a magazine clipping to make the sun. I decided to use simple shapes for my picture.

What are some of your own memories that you could illustrate? Maybe a favorite book, family trip, holiday or funny pet story. Come up with your own illustration that tells a story of one of your favorite memories. 

Suggested Materials:
Construction paper 
Magazine 
Napkin or paper towel
Glue stick
Scissors 

Find a CMA Studio Challenge that speaks to you and share your creations on social media by tagging #myCMAstudio. 

#myCMAstudio is a digital version of our drop-in program, Open Studio, which is currently unavailable to the public due to Covid-19, and part of CMA’s JPMorgan Chase Center for Creativity Studio to explore ideas, solve creative challenges, and collaborate with friends and family. 

Pick up a Studio in a Box with all the supplies and materials needed to aid you in our weekly challenges or allow our CMA educators to guide kids 1- 8th grade in an online Studio Workshop

Artwork and prompt created by Wendy Kendrick in partnership with Art in House by the Ohio Alliance of Art Education. 

Wendy is heavily influenced during the early part of her artist career by the work of Romare Bearden, she has applied her years of work with collage and mixed media to her current work with quilted portrait masks.

In 2010 Kendrick was selected by the Arts Council Lake Erie West to travel to the East African country of Tanzania as a U.S. delegate for a women’s artist exchange. In addition, she was invited to speak to college students regarding her artistic journey at the U.S. Embassy in Dar es Salaam.

Kendrick received her B.A. in Visual Studies from Dartmouth College and has furthered her studies through additional coursework taken at the Dayton Art Institute, Columbus College of Art and Design and Quilt Surface Design Symposium (QSDS). Her work has been featured at the King Arts Complex, Burnell R. Roberts Triangle Gallery at Sinclair Community College (Dayton, Ohio), Star Arts Gallery, Ohio Craft Museum, the Rhodes Office Tower, Joyce Gordon Gallery (Oakland, California), The Shot Tower Gallery and Richard M. Ross Art Museum (Delaware, Ohio). Her work appears in the recent publications, the Columbus Book Project, Yours for Race and Country: Reflections on the Life of Colonel Charles Young and Visioning Human Rights in the New Millennium. Currently Kendrick serves as Lead Artist with the Art in the House Program(OAAE sponsored) at St.Stephens Community House and Windsor Stem Academy.

 

 

Exquisite Corpse #MyCMAStudio Challenge

Have you ever played Telephone — when someone whispers in your ear and you pass the message along? The game of Exquisite Corpse, invented by a playful group of artists who called themselves Surrealists, is similar. You begin drawing, then let a partner add to it. Like a ripple effect, how will the artwork change as it passes between you? 

Ask someone at home with you to be your partner. (If you’re patient, you can even collaborate on this challenge through the mail.) Then gather tools to draw or paint, and fold a piece of paper into thirds.  

The top piece of the paper is all yours. Imagine that this drawing could become a person, and you’re starting with the “head”. But it doesn’t have to be a human one — it could be the head of an animal, or a robot, or a funny-shaped cloud, just to name a few. When you’ve finished, hand the paper over to your partner to pick up where you left off. Imagine that you’re adding a “torso” to this body. What things will you choose to continue, and what will you change? Could you bring in a new color, or a different kind of tool to draw with? For an additional challenge, trade drawings without looking at what your partner has previously drawn.

Finally, hand the paper back to Partner #1 to complete the “legs” or “feet” of this creation. Step back and admire the Exquisite Corpse you made together. What kind of body did you create?

Find a CMA Studio Challenge that speaks to you and share your creations on social media by tagging #myCMAstudio. 

 

Emma Brown is an artist and photographer from a nice cornfield in Pennsylvania. She works in Visitor Experience for Columbus Museum of Art and can be found sleeping in and looking at photographs on her days off. emmabrownmakesart.com @instagrandmabrown

#myCMAstudio is a digital version of our drop- in program, Open Studio. Which is currently unavailable to the public due to Covid-19, and part of CMA’s JPMorgan Chase Center for Creativity Studio to explore ideas, solve creative challenges, and collaborate with friends and family. 

Pick up a Studio in a Box with all the supplies and materials needed to aid you in our weekly challenges or allow our CMA educators to guide kids 1- 8th grade in an online Studio Workshop

 

Water is Life #myCMA Studio Challenge

Water is Life: Finding the ripples, swirls, and other inspiration from the water

Water is the single most necessary element to sustain life on the planet. Water is also a great source inspiration for many artists. Many artists and creatives find different ways to represent this beautiful and powerful life force.

Challenge: Observe water and make a picture that represents what you saw, felt and tasted.

Step 1: Drink a glass of water- notice how the water feels on your tongue. Is it cold or room temperature? Does it have a taste? 

Step 2: Look closely at water- Notice if the water is completely still or does it have ripples and swirls? Are there any other shapes or lines that you see in the water?

Step 3: Wash your hands- the next time you wash your hands pay attention to how the water feels. Notice the temperature. How does it feel on your hands with or without soap. 

Make art: There are no rules to how your interpretation of water should look. It can be any color, any shape that makes sense to you.

Find a CMA Studio Challenge that speaks to you and share your creations on social media by tagging #myCMAstudio. 

 

April Sunami joins us through a partnership with the Art in the House program sponsored by the Ohio Alliance of Art Education

April is a professional visual artist primarily focusing on mixed-media painting and installation. She earned her Master of Arts Degree in Art History from Ohio University and her Bachelor of Arts Degree from the Ohio State University. Sunami is also an award-winning installation artist through the 2012 Columbus Art Pop-Up Project sponsored by the Greater Columbus Arts Council. Her work has been widely exhibited in galleries and museums including the Columbus Museum of Art, National African America Museum and Cultural Center and the Southern Ohio Museum. Sunami is married to writer and philosopher Christopher Sunami. They both live in Columbus, OH and co-parent two bright and imaginative kids.

 

#myCMAstudio is a digital version of our drop- in program, Open Studio. Which is currently unavailable to the public due to Covid-19, and part of CMA’s JPMorgan Chase Center for Creativity Studio to explore ideas, solve creative challenges, and collaborate with friends and family. 

Pick up a Studio in a Box with all the supplies and materials needed to aid you in our weekly challenges or allow our CMA educators to guide kids 1- 8th grade in an online Studio Workshop

 

Designer Swirls #myCMAStudio Challenge


I step out of the disrupting circumstances of life to make art. I find making art helps me heal. O.K. you may say. How? 

As a child, I gravitated instinctively to art-making and quiet spaces where I would make things with cardboard, glue, rice or shoe polish. These were my art supplies.

As a six-year-old boy they said I was shy, but it was clear to me that I had friends in my mind that wanted to come out on paper as colors, shapes, lines, swoops and swirls. Art, from the beginning, was where I could imagine a nice world. A world where I could wear my Vincent Van Gogh blue swish shoes to the makers studio, play with the blue paint and spread color. Making art that clearly expresses my feelings.  I want to tell all my friends I miss them. 

 

Printables you can use as templates to show how you disrupt your circumstances. 

Find a CMA Studio Challenge that speaks to you and share your creations on social media by tagging #myCMAstudio. 

— Richard Duarte Brown, known as Duarte, is a master artist with the TRANSIT ARTS Youth Arts Program and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education’s Art in the House Program. For more than 30 years, Duarte has dedicated his talents to helping young people in Columbus, Ohio through countless programs including CAPACITY (CAPA’s Youth Arts Program), the Short Stop Youth Center, the King Arts Complex, Ohio Alliance for Arts Education’s (and formerly GCAC’s) Artists-in-Schools program, GCAC’s Children of the Future, Ebony Boys, Art Safe and VSA Ohio. More than my Brother’s Keeper, Duarte has also worked as a high school art instructor at the Arts and College Preparatory Academy in Columbus. Currently, he serves as a resident artist for Whitehall City Schools and Berne Union Schools in the Village of Sugar Grove, Ohio. His murals can be seen throughout the city, bringing comfort and inspiration to countless viewers.

#myCMAstudio is a digital version of our drop- in program, Open Studio. Which is currently unavailable to the public due to Covid-19, and part of CMA’s JPMorgan Chase Center for Creativity Studio to explore ideas, solve creative challenges, and collaborate with friends and family. 

Pick up a Studio in a Box with all the supplies and materials needed to aid you in our weekly challenges or allow our CMA educators to guide kids Pre-K – 8th grade in an online Studio Workshop

 

Woman-About-Town: Newark’s Own Ema Spencer

Ema Spencer was born to Dr. Benjamin Franklin Spencer and his wife, Susan Porter Spencer, in the Licking County village of Gratiot, Ohio, on March 1, 1857. Benjamin was a well-respected physician in the area and Susan managed the Spencer home and children, which included Ema, Carolyn (b. 1862/63), and Charles Hildreth (b. 1870).

Studio portrait of a young Ema Spencer by "Walt A. Smith" of Newark, Ohio, date unknown. Courtesy: Licking County Historical Society, Newark, Ohio

Studio portrait of a young Ema Spencer by “Walt A. Smith” of Newark, Ohio, date unknown.
Courtesy: Licking County Historical Society, Newark, Ohio

Visitors to Gratiot today might find it hard to believe that this one-street town was once even smaller, but in 1880, the first census in Gratiot recorded a population of only 67. Spencer attended Newark High School, which was about 15 miles away, and graduated Valedictorian of her class. She went on to study at the Young Ladies’ Institute in nearby Granville before working briefly as a school teacher in the area; she then joined her brother Charles at the Newark Advocate. By the early 1890s, Ema Spencer was managing three different departments for the Sunday edition.

Image of glass plate negative by Ema Spencer (Photoshopped
positive images), c.1909. Courtesy: The Webb House Museum, Newark, Ohio

 

In 1898, Spencer helped found the Newark Camera Club with Clarence H. White. The club’s first exhibition was held in August of that year, at Spencer’s home on North Fourth Street. A few months later, Spencer was named Secretary of the Ohio State Association of Amateur Photographers. Though Spencer shot various portraits and city scenes and even published a photo-essay on Granville in Ohio Magazine in 1906, the fine art photographs she produced were quite different. The photographs were often softly-lit domestic scenes featuring simple props like apples, dandelions, and that timeless camera magnet, the cat. Her photographs also focused on the children in her life, allowing viewers charming glimpses into their activities. Her photographic series, A Day in the Life of a Child, depicts scenes of daily life from a child’s perspective.

Spencer and White’s friendship grew and they began to share the operation of a studio. As White became better known outside of Newark, Spencer continued to bolster his work. She wrote the introduction for his solo exhibition at the Camera Club of New York; and an essay, focused specifcally on White’s photographic style, for Camera Craft magazine in 1901.

After White left Newark in 1906, the Newark Camera Club appears to have dissolved; however, Spencer’s photography career continued. Between 1906 and 1914, Spencer showed work in at least seven exhibitions: two in the UK; one in Italy, where she was awarded a silver medal; one in Germany,where she was awarded a bronze medal; and several in New York, including a solo exhibition at the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences in 1914. Throughout her career, reproductions of her work were printed domestically and abroad in magazines like Photograms of the Year, Camera Craft, and The Photographic Times.

Spencer also continued to be an active member of the larger Newark community. Her long-held interest in promoting literacy led her to serve as one of the founding board members of the Newark Public Library. She is also said to have operated a lending library out of the home she shared with her niece Marian. In 1916, Spencer, using the penname “Aunt Ca’line,” began writing a dailycolumn for the Advocate. She would write this column, titled “The Melting Pot,” for 25 years, stopping only near the end of her life. Spencer died on September 30, 1941 at the age of 84.

Despite her significant photography career, it appears that Spencer’s work has only played a major role in one exhibition since her death, a group show of Newark-area women called In Pursuit of Art Amid Difficulties, organized by The Licking County Historical Society and The Ohio State University, Newark, in 1988.

Ema Spencer’s photographs are on display as part of the exhibition No Mere Button-Pressers: Clarence H. White, Ema Spencer, and The Newark Camera Club, a joint production by CMA and The Works: Ohio Center for History, Art & Technology.

-Jordan Spencer, CMA Curatorial Assistant 

Patterns of Monet #MyCMAStudio Challenge

Use magazines, old calendars, construction paper, and similar items to replicate the brush work of Impressionism. 

Contemporary collage Artist replicates Columbus Museum of Art’s, The Mediterranean, by Claude Monet.

After choosing a favorite photo, or painting as a reference, begin by selecting a piece of construction paper that could be used as a background color. If construction paper is not available you may use printer paper (printer paper can be painted to the background color if you wish). Examine the photo or painting for patterns you would like to replicate. Then find patterns and/or colors from old magazines, calendars, and other collage materials. Feel free to add interesting patterns to your design! For example, I use a blue checkered pattern for the sky background.

After breaking down the initial design, keep collaging to replicate the brush work of Monet, and other Impressionist Artists. Cool colors like blue will recede from the surface, whereas warm colors will come forward. The more colors you add to your patterns, the more interesting they will become!

Items used to make this challenge:
8 ½ by 11 construction paper
Exacto knife, or cut safe scissors
Old magazines
Old calendar
Favorite landscape photo, or painting for visual reference.

Find a CMA Studio Challenge that speaks to you and share your creations on social media by tagging #myCMAstudio.

Julian Cennamo, has almost ten years of service as a Gallery Associate with the Columbus Museum of Art. As a contemporary collage and landscape Artist, he has exhibited with the Georgian Museum, Roy G. Biv., and many others. He currently offers classes at the Wagnalls Memorial Library, and volunteers as a Trustee of Ohio Art League. He graduated from the Columbus College of Art and Design, and remembers childhood visits to CMA with his family.

#myCMAstudio is a digital version of our drop- in program, Open Studio. Which is currently unavailable to the public due to Covid-19, and part of CMA’s JPMorgan Chase

Center for Creativity Studio to explore ideas, solve creative challenges, and collaborate with friends and family. 

Pick up a Studio in a Box with all the supplies and materials needed to aid you in our weekly challenges or allow artist educators to guide kids Pre-K – 8th grade in an online Studio Workshop.